PAPERhttp://www.qladfj.tw/PAPERen-usFri, 16 Aug 2019 22:19:58 -0000https://assets.rbl.ms/19068909/210x.pnghttp://www.qladfj.tw/ PAPER Post Malone on His Perfect Partnership With Bud Lighthttp://www.qladfj.tw/post-malone-bud-light-collab-2639861497.html

On August 5, fans lined up on 32nd St in New York outside The Cutting Room, a dive bar-slash-music venue, to see Post Malone perform with Sublime with Rome as his backing band. The "Rockstar" singer, who deftly defies genre despite consistent attempts to lock him into one label, was posted up in a tour bus right double parked outside the venue, which streams of cars edged around in the early evening rush hour traffic. The brightly lit bus was filled with kids in their very early 20s, smoking cigarettes, drinking beers and generally kicking it while Post and friends played beer pong in the back.

None


The Bud Light Dive Bar Tour series is known for putting mega stars like Post in super intimate venues to connect with fans in a way they might have when they were on the come up. (Lady Gaga is a past performer). Post played in Nashville last year, and given his demonstrative love for beer and Budweiser in particular, the exquisitely matched partnership also now includes a mythology-themed merch collaboration featuring some of Post's favorite things, like dragons, swords, cowboys, his tattoos and some of his lyrics. Post is poised to cross the threshold into verified style icon after years of being (mostly lovingly) roasted for his style. His recent collaboration with Crocs sold out almost instantly.

Speaking with Post, or Posty as nearly everyone in his professional orbit affectionately calls him, in between shots, he admitted he was a little nervous for his show. Given his experiences traveling the world as an opener for Justin Bieber's massive Purpose tour, not to mention playing stadiums of his own, it was surprising to hear the Texas native say he was drinking to calm his nerves.

None


Related | Post Malone on Memes, Bieber Fans and the Importance of Beer

None


"It's very personal, you can see everyone there. It takes me back to playing little acoustic shows," he said, before agreeing that there's no better feeling than hearing fans singing back your lyrics to you (but being close enough to see them is a little different). "That's definitely the best part," he said. "That's also the most nerve-wracking part, because you know whenever you got huge lights set up all over you, you can't really see all the people. Whenever you can see them and they're all staring right at you, it's very nerve-wracking. That's why I'm playing so much beer pong."

It turns out he had little reason to be nervous at all, as a screaming crowd greeted Post the minute he walked on stage in a hand embroidered jacket, curly hair frizzed in the hot and sweaty room. Post announced his third album will drop this September before bringing NYC legend Fat Joe on the stage for "All the Way Up" and "Lean Back," and playing Santeria with the absolutely ecstatic Sublime. In between songs, including his new track with Young Thug, "Goodbye," and a run through of hits like "Congratulations," "Sunflower" and of course "White Iverson," Post riffed with the crowd and even handed out beers. He didn't flinch when a bra went flying at the stage.

None


"I'm just a guy," he said before the show. "I have really beautiful blue eye, but at the end of the day, I'm just a guy. I'm just joking."

None


None


None


None


None


Photos courtesy Bud Light

]]>
Fri, 16 Aug 2019 22:12:54 +0000http://www.qladfj.tw/post-malone-bud-light-collab-2639861497.htmlBud lightDive bar tourPost maloneClaire Valentine
Would You Wear a Scented Diptyque Candle?http://www.qladfj.tw/diptyque-scented-tattoo-2639858896.html

In the past few years, we have witnessed a sort of mass infusion of scent into literally everything: oils, tea lights, necklaces, and even matchboxes.

None


And now, moving beyond its existing and popular array of fragrances and candles, Parisian luxury perfumer, Diptyque is introducing a set of scented tattoos. Because why not?

None


The set of five "scented stickers" will drop as part of the new Prêts-à-Parfumer collection, which will also feature a range of different products including a perfumed brooch shaped like a bird, and a braided-thread bracelet.


None


The tattoo, which apparently smells like roses, is further made from "mat satin" for a smooth finish and features motifs akin to shadow puppets. "This graphic, baroque decoration can be positioned wherever you want, whenever you want: inside the wrist, for example, or at the base of your neck or the curve of your shoulder," the brand said in a press release.

None


Next up the bracelet, which is also infused with perfume, and can be cut to a custom length. "It can be attached and detached at will, thanks to a gold-plated clasp, and spreads its scent whenever you gesture with your hand," the brand said.

None


None


Lastly, the brooch, which literally resembles a bird is made from gilded metal and is inspired by the "wooden birds that once inhabited" Diptyque's original boutique. The brand describes it as "a perfumed ornament inspired by Renaissance pomanders scented jewellery shaped to suit the tastes of the day."

None


None


Although scented tattoo sor a bracelet that smells like roses might seem like a bit of an odd concept to begin with, it's all part of Diptyque's larger strategy to appeal to a younger set of audience — mainly Gen Z and young millennials. "It's part of our DNA and heritage to create playful new perfume gestures," Julien Gommichon, president of the Americas for Diptyque, told WWD.

None


The Prêts-à-Parfumer collection drops early September and will be available for purchase on diptyqueparis.com and across Diptyque stores.

None


Photos courtesy of Diptyque

]]>
Fri, 16 Aug 2019 21:29:51 +0000http://www.qladfj.tw/diptyque-scented-tattoo-2639858896.htmlDiptyquePret a parfumerPerfumed tattooScented tattooWwdBrocheBraceletAccessoriesJeena Sharma
Taylor Swift Stans React to 'Lover'http://www.qladfj.tw/taylor-swift-stans-react-lover-2639859567.html

The title track from Taylor Swift's eighth album Lover is finally here, and it's a slow, sugary sweet guitar ballad presumably written for her longtime beau Joe Alwyn. There are a few things to note about the new song, her fourth single from the album, which drops in full this time next week. Firstly: it's the first track Swift has written without the aid of collaborators since 1984's "This Love," released in 2014. Secondly: a lot of people think it's proof that Swift and Alwyn are secretly engaged, or have already tied the knot.

None


The engagement theory rests on the the song's bridge lyrics, which heavily reference wedding tropes and subtly resemble marriage vows: "Ladies and gentlemen, will you please stand?/ With every guitar string scar on my hand I take this magnetic force of a man to be my lover / My heart's been borrowed and yours has been blue/ All's well that ends well to end up with you/ Swear to be overdramatic and true to my lover."


None


Note especially the "something borrowed, something blue" thing. Stans immediately picked up on it, and one Tumblr post calling attention to the obvious wedding reference even garnered a like from Ms. Swift herself. Which naturally has people thinking there's credence to the theory that she and Alwyn are betrothed, or soon will be. There's even a track on Lover called "Paper Rings." It's actually... kind of awkward if Joe hasn't proposed yet, when it's so clearly on Taylor's mind?

None


Even if they're not fully on board with the engagement theory, most Swifties are loving "Lover," and excited that their fave is in such a good romantic place. After, you know, a decade's worth of tabloid-worthy dramas. The best stan reactions, below.




None


Related | The 12 Best Celebrity Couples of Summer 2019









[twitter_embed https://twitter.com/cmtswift/statuses/1162256645071593472 expand=1]



None


Photo via Instagram

]]>
Fri, 16 Aug 2019 20:30:22 +0000http://www.qladfj.tw/taylor-swift-stans-react-lover-2639859567.htmlJoe alwynLoverMusicTwitterSwiftiesStan storiesTheoriesWeddingEngagementFandomDramaTaylor swiftKatherine Gillespie
Bops Only: 10 Songs You Need to Start Your Weekend Righthttp://www.qladfj.tw/bops-only-fletcher-2639855811.html

New Music Friday always promises a plethora of that good-good new-new from some of your favorite artists, maybe some long-awaited, maybe some tired, through, and delayed, and maybe some songs by a treasure trove of #whos you've never heard of before. We know. It's overwhelming! Thank the heavens PAPER is here help sift through the goodness, the garbage, and the noise, and bring you the best every Friday. We gotchu, sis. Let's bop to it!


None


This year, Fletcher has released a stream of brutally honest singles that have gained momentum on the pop charts ("Undrunk" is a Top 20 hit). But it's not only her songwriting and ear for tuneful melodies that are making them stick, it's her willingness to share even her most heartbreaking truths with audiences. Fletcher is a queer woman singing specifically in her newer songs about a relationship with another woman, but her songs are deeply universal. Complete with acoustic guitar, top-notch production, and emotive vocals, "All Love" is all feeling, regardless of who that love is for. Who can't relate to the (often painful) experience of seeing your ex unexpectedly, some time after the dust has settled? Fletcher tries to play it cool when she spots her ex in a bar: "The way you kiss her on her neck/ With that look in your eyes/ Do it right in front of me/ Kinda makes me wanna die/But it's all love/I hate the feeling, but it's all love." "All Love" comes from Fletcher's new EP, you ruined new york city for me, out now, and available to stream here.


None


Slayyyter's best single to-date is out now. "Cha Ching" builds on the momentum of her recent sold-out Mini Tour, finding the St. Louis pop sensation doubling down on the sticky hooks and songwriting prowess that first got her attention online a year ago. The song is about dodging hangers-on and fake friends, while calling out wannabe ballers. "I'm so precious," she drawls, sounding like a sexed-up cross between Gwen Stefani and her key inspo, Britney Spears. Not to mention, the glitchy Robokid-produced beat combined with Slayyyter's bratty rapping also tests well on the street, and I would know, having strutted to it while grabbing my morning coffee. "Cha Ching" also brilliantly captures a cultural pop moment (circa 2006) when women from the Pussycat Dolls on down made pop empowering themselves. Back then, money was the cheapest way to those women's hearts. It still rings true today.

None


In Conversation: Slayyyter and Heidi Montag


None


Vōx's latest single "I Can Feel Myself Leaning" chronicles a woman on the edge. As such, mutated vocals and a brooding atmosphere accompany self-effacing lyrics like "Why would you stay with me when I'm like this?" That line, repeated for emphasis as a trap-based instrumental looms in the background, sounds how my internal meltdowns do, to be honest. Nevertheless, it makes for a thrilling listen, ensuring listeners follow vōx to said edge. Imagining what happens next for her is the most exciting part.


None


Rosalía, the Catalan pop futurist determined to transform the look and feel of modern pop stardom, creates yet another banger, this time with Puerto Rican crooner Ozuna in "Yo x Ti, Tu x Mi." The two trade flirty verses that sound like hooks, meaning every turn of phrase is expertly crafted for maximum sonic pleasure. Also, it doesn't hurt that "I for you, you for me," is one of the cutest ways to say "I love you" probably ever.


None


"No one ever told me leaving was the easy part," MUNA's Katie Gavin sings, her voice crackling with ache. The difficulty of keeping distance after a gnarly breakup is what she's exploring. Set to relentless electronic beats recalling early Daft Punk, Gavin and cohort ruminate poetically on all the moments they want to connect, but have to instead rely on memory. "I don't do most things I used to do/ Actually, now that I'm thinking about it/ I did most things to get to you." "Stayaway" is MUNA's latest single from their upcoming album, Saves the World; watch the video here.

None


Related | Hole Drummer Patty Schemel Interviews MUNA


None


Lolo Zoua?, the rising French-Algerian pop musician drops the video to "Caffeine" today. Accordingly, the clip, showing Zoua? in varied dreamlike scenes, captures the song's fizzy nature. In the song, from her debut High Highs and Low Lows, Zoua? is a coquettish player in control. "Don't wanna get to know you," she sings slyly atop a dark lullaby melody. And despite the deceptively laid-back vibe of "Caffeine," the last thing you'll want to do is sleep on it.

None


Related | Lolo Zoua? Is on the Ride of Her Life


None


You may have heard alt-R&B singer Peyton's music on the third season of Issa Rae's Insecure, which featured a lush song of hers called "Sweet Honey." Her new single "laylo/crazy4U" is another standout from the Houston musician. She sings sweetly about catching feelings in a way that is refreshing. Peyton's emotions are bigger than her, and in laying her cards on the table, all shame is removed. "How the fuck can I hide this feeling?" she sings in the track's dreamy first half, before confessing in the song's coda: "I'm crazy for you." Also, it's worth noting that Peyton's voice and singing style recall '90s R&B girl groups of yore, reflecting a more innocent time when Black girls tacked posters of SWV, TLC, and 702 from teen magazines to their bedroom walls. Can we go back to those days?


None


California musician Chelsea Wolfe's newest single "Be All Things" offers a more vulnerable side of her. Though Wolfe's work remains both deeply personal and often world-centric, the song strips back most of her usually more experimental elements, leaving Wolfe's hypnotic voice, meditative acoustic guitar, and poetic lyrics to take center stage. The song, from her upcoming sixth album, Birth of Violence, documents Wolfe's experiences as a modern woman, namely the idea that women around the world are full of duality. Women are often expected to be soft, but strong; human, but godlike. "Warriors, newborns, and queens/ The lion and the wolf/ Gnarling at eternal sleep/ Let it burn," she sings. By acknowledging all she can be, she embodies everything. Watch the video, here.


None


Iranian-Swedish singer Snoh Aalegra returns with her second studio album, = Ugh, Those Feels Again, out now. Of the 14 tracks (all of them are terrific), "Whoa" is a catchy, soulful bop about falling hard in love. In the first verse, Snoh fantasizes about what could be, asking to spend time with the object of her affection. By the memorable syllabic chorus, she's totally lost for words. There's something nostalgic about the way Snoh sings, making "Whoa" take on deeper meaning. Perhaps this crush was forever ago, perhaps it's wrapping her up right now. Apply your own logic to it, whether you're having a Hot Girl Summer, or you're gearing up for cuffing season. "Whoa" is here for all stages of love that are new and exciting.


None


Rapper Reese LaFlare's music has always embodied his colorful past and interests. The ex-pro skater still reps the DIY punk culture of his roots, as shown on "Lil Skate For President," part of a double-single EP out now that includes "Cash Talk." Set to a booming, repetitive beat, LaFlare energetically acknowledges his accomplishes and reflects on his time in the spotlight, shouts-out to God included. To that end, "Lil Skate For President" is ultimately endearing because LaFlare's best tracks position him as a winner. It's hard not to cheer him on.

None


What's your favorite track of the week? See you next week, lovers!

None


Photography: Joe Perri

]]>
Fri, 16 Aug 2019 20:01:56 +0000http://www.qladfj.tw/bops-only-fletcher-2639855811.htmlFletcherSlayyyterVoxRosaliaOzunaMunaLolo zouaiPeytonChelsea wolfeSnoh aalegraReese laflareMusicNew music fridayBops onlyMichael Love Michael
Normani, Please Take Your Foot Off My Neckhttp://www.qladfj.tw/normani-motivation-video-2639859084.html

Normani's long-awaited solo debut is finally here, and after all this time, did you really expect it to be anything other than perfection?

None


The former Fifth Harmony member has been charting over the past year, partnering with both Sam Smith and Khalid on massive hits. Despite the success, we had yet to receive a solo single — until now. "Motivation" is legitimately the ONLY video you need to watch today. In under four minutes, Normani proves she's an absolute triple threat, as if it wasn't obvious before. The MTV throwback vibes are strong, the dance moves are tight, and the vocals are oh-so-right.

None


Related | Normani Is the Next Household Name

None


She's been teasing the track for a while now, with a clip making the rounds on Twitter stan accounts of her singing a line from the second verse: "Get you naked, but I won't tell 'em." If that little taste could get stans excited for weeks leading up to the release, then you can probably find Harmonizers passed out on their keyboards after hearing the full track and seeing the unexpected full-length video.


None


In the video, an actress playing a young Normani watches 106 & Park in the living room, dancing along to future Normani's new hip-rolling bop. Then, the stanning ensues: Normani immediately busts out every dance move in the book while rocking silver hoops and a pink "1996" spray-painted top and skirt. This is, of course, to seduce all of her handsome and very buff costars, and judging by the final dance break at sunset, it worked!

None


Related | Behind the Scenes of Normani's Tidal X Show

None


The real star of the show is the trumpet-laden dance break at the end of the video. Normani, drenched from the pouring rain and covered in a silver glitz-fringe garment, takes her moves to the street. This is where you'll find the most GIF-able music video moment of the year, which is obviously her handstand into a split-and-pop combo. This is how you do a solo career launch right, and there's only more to come from here.


None


Photo via YouTube

]]>
Fri, 16 Aug 2019 19:28:59 +0000http://www.qladfj.tw/normani-motivation-video-2639859084.htmlNormaniFifth harmonyBrendan Wetmore
Fat and All That: Beth Ditto Talks About Being Calvin Klein's Fat Underwear Modelhttp://www.qladfj.tw/beth-ditto-calvin-klein-2639822192.html

This week Calvin Klein released their new #MyCalvins underwear campaign, starring a parade of today's sexiest stars: Bella Hadid, Naomi Campbell, Diplo, Odell Beckham, Jr., Matthew Noszka and Beth Ditto primp and prance around in their undies. Ditto isn't the first plus size model to appear in a Calvin campaign. The singer Chika appeared in an underwear ad for the brand earlier this year, and size 10 model Myla Dalbesio has also posed in her Calvins. Still, having a self-proclaimed fat girl like Ditto in this marquee campaign from the ultimate underwear brand is a big deal for body positivity. We caught up with Ditto on her tour bus to find out how she felt about showing off for us in her skivvies.

None


Related | Beth Ditto Is Rock's Homecoming Queen

None


What did you think when they first reached out to you for this campaign?

My first thought was probably something like, "Are you sure?" Followed by my excitement and then by doubt. I was so sure it would fall through! I am very superstitious. I do not count my chickens before they hatch — not even AFTER they hatch! So, I held my breath. Even after the shoot I was just sure they would change their minds!

None


None


Did you ever have any larger sized role models growing up?

My fat (by the way: f-a-t, only 3 letters, not four. It is not offensive so please do not be afraid to use it!) role models were few. But they were there. I consider one of my strongest attributes to be my ability to seek out the cool, the empowering, the weird, the moving, the creative, what have you. No matter what lemons life gave me I would be swimming in lemonade before I knew it. So lucky to have that super power. Though they were few and far between I managed to dig deep.

Starting first with my earliest role model, Miss Piggy. So ahead of her time. Of course Mama Cass, Big Mama Thornton, Deborah Lyall of Romeo Void, Griselda, Allison Moyet, Divine. The list goes on. It's funny because I feel society thinks fat people in the public eye is this new concept, but really, we were always there. Just not necessarily participating where we could be seen choosing nonconformity. I think the point of body positivity is lost on people within the scene as well as outside. It's not always about being a fame machine. Though that's okay, too! Work it y'all! To me it's about ending the search for outside validation.

None


"I feel society thinks fat people in the public eye is this new concept, but really, we were always there. Just not necessarily participating where we could be seen choosing nonconformity."

None


Do you like lingerie and sexy undies?

I'm so practical. All black usually. Not many frills. I like a classic and simple silhouette. When lingerie is too complicated it gets in the way of my sexy!

But sexy yes!

None


What do you consider your sexiest feature?

[laughs] My sexiest feature? My skin? I think. I am always told how good my skin feels. Even by masseuses. I shave my legs every single day. I moisturize like a maniac. Buffalo Bill would've picked me. That's how soft my skin is.

Photos via Calvin Klein

]]>
Fri, 16 Aug 2019 19:04:45 +0000http://www.qladfj.tw/beth-ditto-calvin-klein-2639822192.htmlFat and all thatCalvin kleinNaomi campbellBeth dittoMickey Boardman
Shura Finds Lasting Love on 'forevher'http://www.qladfj.tw/shura-forevher-interview-2639857034.html

When I first met Shura, we almost immediately started talking about death. Yes, we exchanged the usual small pleasantries and gushed about the weather in New York, even though it felt like a boiling pot of water to most people on that late July day. But as soon as we sat down on a Brooklyn park bench, the conversation quickly veered into the topic of dying, or more specifically, Carrie Fisher's death.

None


The death of the Star Wars icon was a surprising influence on the British singer's sophomore album forevher, specifically on the sparse, forlorn ballad "princess leia" (stylized lower case). Fisher's health scares first started on a plane, and Shura found out the news of her death after landing in Dubai, about to jump on another flight to Australia. It was a mere coincidence, but one that inspired Shura to write a song about her own death.

None


"I spend a lot of time thinking about people dying. And it's like, 'Well, hang on a second, I should just fucking enjoy that they're alive'," she remarked. "I tried to do some prep with Carrie Fisher, because it looked like she was going to die, and then still, when I landed in Dubai, I was just like, 'What the actual fuck? How is Princess Leia dead? Why? What?' Death is just… it is such an absurdity. I remember my dad saying, 'Death is absurd,' that one second you're on, and the next second you're switched off, and it's like everything that you are is gone."

None


Aside from "princess leia," forevher sounds like the exact opposite of death. In fact, the album feels somewhat like a rebirth. It tells the story of Shura's burgeoning romance, from the moment she first met her current girlfriend on, where else, a dating app, to the day they moved into a Brooklyn apartment together. Sonically, she dives into Janet Jackson-esque funk grooves, '70s soul melodies, and ethereal soft disco ballads that carry a sense of self-assuredness. And while her nerves are sometimes palpable in the words she sings, she has an anxiety that appears to propel her forward, rather than completely shutting her down.


None


It's a far cry from her debut record Nothing's Real, a psychedelic '80s synth-pop album that perfectly captures the feelings of dealing with crippling anxiety about literally everything, even anxiety itself. "I remember having this conversation with my therapist about the idea of me being an anxious person, and her asking the question of, 'Do you think there's a part of you that's trying to hold onto that as an identity? That maybe that's not true of you," she explained. "Maybe you're not an anxious person, and maybe you need to let go of this narrative that you've created for yourself.'" Her willingness to put her love life on display so confidently on forevher shows that while Shura's anxieties may still linger, the narrative is gone.

None


Shura was in Minneapolis writing music when she connected with her current partner, Pauline, who is based in New York, on Raya. Their sporadic DMs turned into iMessages, and their daily texts into lengthy late night phone calls. One day, Pauline urged her to stop in New York before she headed back home to London, but she was hesitant. "I was exhausted. I'd spent two months touring the States, so I had eaten my way through 50 chicken fried steaks, and McDonald's," she explains. "I wasn't feeling good about my body. I didn't want to turn up and all my pictures were these amazing press shots, and I'm, 'Hi,' and [she's like] 'Oh, you look better when you have hair and makeup.' Well, of course."

None


Related | How Clairo Becomes a Classic

None


Eventually, she simply said "fuck it" (literally) and flew to New York, booking a bougie luxury hotel and calling her friends to be on standby in case things went haywire. They had their first date at a show headlined by MUNA, the queer pop band of the moment. Her friends weren't needed. They quickly entered an official long distance relationship, flying across the Atlantic to visit each other. Some people would see this as a struggle, but as Shura kept writing every new step they took, both together and thousands of miles apart, into song, she found their time apart to be a valuable asset.

None


"So much of the album was written about a relationship where we couldn't always touch, so when we did, that was so exciting," she explained. "It's having that longing, and that separation, and the text messages, and back and forth. And also, just going back to that thing of being a kid and remembering when you brushed hands with someone, you'd literally be like, 'Oh my God. I'm so excited. This is the most incredible thing.' And I think, sometimes, the best part about relationships is that question of, 'Is it going to happen, is it not going to happen? Does she like me, does she not like me?' And then, discovering that."

None


In another ironic twist, the hypnotic and slightly unholy "religion (u can put your hands on me)" was written when she quite literally couldn't put her hands on her crush at the time, even though she would've done anything to do just that. "The way that we talk about love and sex is often very similar words to the way we talk about faith," she said of the song's inspiration. "The idea of devoting yourself to someone is sacred, or the act of worshiping. People lay their hands on people to heal them, or to bless them, or to baptize them, and that's what we do in love. We touch people with our hands."

None


On forevher, Shura tracks every step of their journey with precise detail and whimsical imagery, from that fateful first date on "the stage," to facing her fear of planes on the wistful R&B-jazz number "flyin," and finally committing to forever (or as close as you can get to it without marriage) on the anthemic title track. The result is a time capsule of powerful, healthy, all-consuming love, undoubtedly a huge victory for any queer person. The finale "skyline, be mine" only has two short verses, but the message is clear: their bodies, hearts, and souls now belong to each other.

None


The idea of sexuality has been a near-constant in her life, even before she realized her own. Shura was born Alexandra Lilah Denton in Manchester, England, just two minutes before her twin brother Nick, who is also "a flaming homosexual," as she described. "My dad always jokes that my brother came out of my mum and just had this face of, 'I never want to go near one of those ever again,'" she remarks, imitating his disgusted baby face.

None


Her parents gave the twins a very normal upbringing, and both were very supportive of Nick's sexuality, and later hers. Her dad, especially, made it super easy for them to come out. "My dad had said to Nick, at some point, he'd found gay porn on the history or whatever, and just was like, 'Look, should I just assume you're gay until you tell me you're straight?' to my twin. And he said, 'Yeah,' which is really great, because you don't have to say the words, 'I'm gay,' which is really scary for a lot of people," she recalled. "And then at one point, I just had a friend who was coming around a lot, sleeping over a lot, and my dad just went, 'Shall I just assume that this girl is your girlfriend?' And I just went, 'Yeah.' It was really easy."

None


Related | Maarquii's 'Full Outfit' Is Queer, Black and Sexually Liberated

None


While coming out was simple when Shura discovered her sexuality, it took a lot of time to realize that she could even be attracted to women. When her friends started to crush on boys and put on makeup, she still paid no mind to love and wanted to play football, simply thinking she was just entering puberty later than everyone else. She then convinced herself that she liked boys by latching onto their conventionally attractive looks and intellectual abilities, but she still felt nothing physically. But one touch changed everything.

None


"I had a friend at school who I had this very intense friendship with, and we were sat in the cinema," she recalled. "I think, she put her hand on my leg, or my hand on.... We brushed hands. It was, literally, an explosion, physically, emotionally. And, I was like, "What? Oh. I get it. This is what being sexually excited feels like.' So, I just went, 'Okay, maybe, I'm attracted to both.' I didn't really know what was going on. We ended up having this relationship, and I decided well, I must be bisexual because I'm intellectually attracted to men. I can find men attractive." Slowly, she came to realize that she just doesn't find men attractive, and the electricity of simple things like brushing hands and accidental touches remains pervasive in her lyrics today.

None


While forevher is unique in how it tells a story of triumphant, all-encompassing queer love with great precision, the album feels much less isolated than Nothing's Real did with the canon of LGBTQ artists getting much larger in the past couple years. "I'm just really excited for young queer people who are growing up with the internet, who can Google non-binary Black and queer musicians, and there's a wealth of them who are current — not just legacy artists like Melissa Etheridge and k.d. lang. There's people making the kind of music right now that they would also want to listen to and buy all the merch and do all that kind of stuff. That's exciting."

None


Before we part ways, I asked Shura if this love is truly 'forever'? "I feel like every relationship when I'm in it is forever," she said. "That's how I love. I couldn't be in a relationship if I didn't think it was forever." Regardless of how this turns out, the music will surely live on.

forevher


Photo by Hollie Fernando

]]>
Fri, 16 Aug 2019 17:00:01 +0000http://www.qladfj.tw/shura-forevher-interview-2639857034.htmlForevherShuraJake Viswanath
Take a Bite of Sakima's 'Project Peach'http://www.qladfj.tw/sakima-project-peach-2639826567.html

British pop singer/producer Sakima wears his heart on his sleeve, which comes through loud and clear in his work, whether it be about grappling with the pitfalls of dating app culture or lopsided power dynamics in sexual encounters. Sakima has never made any attempt to hide the fact that he's gay or the fact that there's a whole host of unspoken problems that come along with that. His openness and willingness to be candid is also something that also comes across as we connect over the phone the week before the launch of his new mixtape, Project Peach.

None


Our conversation drifts from nerding out over queer history to lamenting the lack of LGBTQ representation in mainstream media growing up, before moving on to the phenomenon of millennial loneliness and finally commiserating about being single. Sakima is careful to fully work through each thought, considering it from multiple angles and relating it back to his own experience, only pausing at one point to get rid of a large spider that had crawled in front of him. He's charming and readily vulnerable; I find myself at the same time opening up to him in ways that I wouldn't normally offer a stranger I wasn't face to face with.

None


Related | All the Pop Science Books That Inspired Mood Killer's Debut EP

None


Everything flows so naturally out of Sakima as if he has been talking about these topics all his life, which he has. For Sakima, being labeled a "queer pop artist" is less of a cross he's forced to bear and more so a mission statement — an embodiment of the change he wants to see in the industry. This mixtape, Project Peach, has been a long time coming for the artist. The culmination of two EPs and a slew of singles have helped to push the pop needle towards a queerer place. Not quite the album he had initially teased in interviews, this mixtape was finally a place for Sakima to tie together all of these loose threads across his work into seven songs.

None


Breaking down Project Peach to its core elements, you find all the right building blocks for a Top 40 song: catchy hooks, glossy instrumentals, lyrics that walk the line between personal and universal. Where it obviously diverges is that it is told through an LGBTQ lens without hesitation; whether or not that proves to be a stumbling block says more about the listener than it does Sakima.

None


None


How did Project Peach come together?

I wrote and produced all of it. I had a couple of my writing friends, The Six, which is a UK writing collective responsible for many big hits, help with a couple. But I think it's good when you're the only one because I write and produce and I'll be singing, all that shit. It can be a great strength to have total control. I've never had anyone in my team really tell me what to do, artistically. They will go with whatever my vision is in the moment. That has been amazing, but equally, really debilitating. You get stuck in your own head, you become a bit of a cage sometimes. Project Peach definitely weighed me the fuck down, so I chilled the fuck out for one sec. It was cool because to orchestrate it and bring the vision together and not have to sacrifice anything and not make any consequence.

None


What's the significance behind the title for the mixtape?

I knew it would be called Project Peach a year and a half ago. I think I even made the artwork a year and a half ago, as well. It was around the time when like Call Me By Your Name, launched "peach" into the mainstream vernacular as slang for ass. I'm a bit of a nerd and I like to nerd out on history a lot. I was reading this article that was "50 Queer Facts from History," and there was one that was talking about this ancient Chinese story. There was this part of it where they refer to being gay as like taking a bite of the forbidden peach. It was hyper poetic and a weirdly beautiful way to describe queer people. Putting the word "Project" before it and making it Project Peach was this nice succinct way of saying, "This is what it's about. It's about history and queer stories and queer life and how they've been separate from music, and what stories I think are missing from music, and how can I address the void of queer stories that I've had since growing up."

None


"Some days I feel really queer, some days I feel like a boy or a girl, some days I feel heteronormative, some days I feel sex-crazed, some days I never want to have sex ever again."

None


Is queer history something you frequently read up on?

I try to, the thing is [Laughs] reading is very hard for me and retaining information is hard. But I try anyway. I do a lot of reading, I do a lot of watching, a lot of listening. A couple of years ago I did a Master's degree in music and that was a great moment where I just really deep dived into queer music and queer history. That is where I started to be like, "Okay, I'm actively going to try and seek this out." With queer history, it's not inherited, we're not born into a community that automatically shares our heritage with us; we have to go out and find it. That's the grit of why we do and don't have certain rights. I think when it's that relevant to you, it's easier to be interested in it. I understand it's not entirely accessible, not everybody wants to go out and find queer literature and all that kind of stuff. It's not like you'll find something. That's why I made the point of putting some of it into my music.

None


Related | Lil Nas X on a Unicorn Floatie

None


What were those queer stories that you had growing up or coming into terms with your sexuality that really resonated for you?

The people who helped me define who I wanted to be as an artist from when I was a kid to a teenager were people like Antony and the Johnsons, Patrick Wolf, and Rufus Wainwright. Those are definitely the core three. I think music is an interesting thing, because it's hard to find mainstream queer music; a lot flies under the radar, there are a lot on the left field. Which is amazing, but there's a lot more people who don't identify as straight or heteronormative, who don't necessarily like music that is underground. Queer music should not just be about being forward-thinking, it's also about it being fun and accessible. You shouldn't have to dig into the dark web to find queer music. I think now we're in an age where queer music is becoming more pop-focused. That's where real progress is made; it's where queer narrative can become a significant part of a mainstream narrative, regardless of being what you identify as.

None


Exactly, look at Lil Nas X, he just made history. A Black gay man now holds the record for longest single at number 1. That's incredible if you think about it.

That's so crazy. I obviously love Lil Nas, and I think that song "Panini" is one of the greatest songs at the moment. He's a fucking genius. It's interesting because he hinted at his sexuality throughout his music, even before he blew up, but he didn't fully publicly be like "this is who I am" until after that song was number one. I wonder if it would have been a different story if he'd always been out, like visibly out. I'm crazy to think about all this kind of shit, but I always do, it's so hard not to. It's always something that's on my mind.


None


Do you ever feel like you're pigeon-holed as a "queer artist," rather than just a pop artist?

I went back and forth between being a bit sick of everything and wanting to be what I want as an artist. You can just like my music if you just like the music. I have a lot of fans that really like the music the way it sounds and don't necessarily listen to the story. As a queer artist, I do think I squeeze between, "I'm more than just a sex-crazed person," which I'm really not and being like, "Fuck it, it's such a big part of who I am." So much of the struggle that I had in my life growing up and within the music industry and also trying to be an artist, so much of the hardship of just being around, being queer, and being a part of that. Some days I feel really queer, some days I feel like a boy or a girl, some days I feel heteronormative, some days I feel sex-crazed, some days I never want to have sex ever again. I don't mind having a reputation of having my songs being hyper-sexual, as long as people are prepared for me to not always be that.

None


Tell me about "Sweet Nothing," which is one of the Project Peach highlights.

I was thinking about modern dating because I'm single and I've been single for fucking ever. I like to think that I choose to be single. There are times when I obviously wish I wasn't; sometimes I really wish I had someone to just hold me at night, sometimes I really want someone to fuck me at night, sometimes I'm really fucking grateful that I don't have to share a bed. I know that this is totally universal, but I have these moments where I redownload Tinder or Grindr and have a weird obsession week on it where it's just me casting the net, saying yes to everyone. And then I get really freaked out by the process of it, feeling really pissed off that life can't bring someone to me. Then I settle on deleting it straight away. It's this DM vortex where you can't stop talking to people, but it's never anything more than that.

None


You can get pretty close to people, you can feel like having a bit of a connection with someone even if you're just chatting on an app. You're chatting about each other's day, each other's lives, before you actually propose you want another date or not. You form this weird few days of connection with them, but 99% of the time it never really progresses into a date or anything IRL. It's all got me thinking about, "Is that what people want? Am I missing something? Is there going to be a tipping point?" Have we already passed that tipping point where people prefer to keep their love interest online, and sex is something that we become less interested in?" It's more about who's going to like you; who's going to like your picture, who can you have a chat with the longest and all that kind of shit.

None


"The motivation of my music has always been to express the hidden stories that are all around us but never discussed."

None


It's an endless cycle.

"Sweet Nothing" explores what would it feel like if I only wanted that. If I wasn't looking for anything real, this digital romance which people might one day prefer. People might prefer having a relationship with a screen, rather than having a relationship with a real person. One of my ex-boyfriends was a bit of an alcoholic and a bit of a druggy, and it all was a horrible time and life was all quite dark. It built this social anxiety in me where now I find being in a bar really hard to get through because it just brings back feelings. I think that's something connected to this social anxiety I have, where it's a lot more comfortable to just be at home in your own safe space, but with a connection to the outside world through your phone. So this song is about the sweetest thing that doesn't exist, that's why it's called "Sweet Nothing."

None


There is something to be said about putting yourself out there, but from the comfort of your own bed.

When it's too uncomfortable, you just turn it off. I hate the feeling of not being able to make everything stop, when my anxiety starts spinning out. Whereas if I'm on my phone at home, there's this element of fun you can have online, that's way safer for me. I think there's something about the connection between drinking culture and dating culture. Especially in the UK, the drinking culture is fucking massive, it's like the core of almost everyone's lives and I like the juxtaposition between that and online culture. They don't really sit that well together. They don't really connect. It gets to a certain point where you have to pick one. Are you going to hide or are you going to be seen?


None


Do you feel like that sentiment permeates its way into the rest of the mixtape?

There is another song in this mixtape called "God Fearing Men." It's about how religion can affect people who are queer and the experiences they had that oppressed them. I have friends that have grown up in environments where it's not okay to be gay. Even though they are not in those environments anymore, as adults they made a prison within themselves, based on their upbringing or childhood or their past experiences.

None


There was this guy I was going out with who was really afraid of something. It was kind of a crisis of identity; this was all very new for him, romantically being with a guy. My brain turns it into this thing where they have the "fear of God." This thing that someone is watching them; they have to make sure they're making the right decision, and they have to make sure that they know themselves. "God" is a really great by-word for the indescribable anxiety that we feel about our identities. This song is about me trying to tell someone that they don't have to be afraid, everything is cool, I just really love them, they really love me, and it's not a bad thing.

None


What do you hope people take away from the project?

The motivation of my music has always been to express the hidden stories that are all around us but never discussed. If people can feel like someone is finally telling their story, they feel recognized, they feel visible because of something I've written, that's the biggest reward.

None


What can we expect to see from Sakima going forward?

I have started to really think about what comes after this. I've been saying that Project Peach is like a swan song project. It's sort of like a closing chapter, a better metaphor, of who I've been up to now. My creed isn't ever gonna really change, my rationale for doing music is never really going to change in terms of queer stories and perspectives. I definitely have settled on a concept for a project that I'm just starting to work on now that I've subtly been hinting at on Instagram and in some of the songs that are on Project Peach. But Project Peach is the final chapter of basically who I've been over the past... forever as Sakima. This is me taking the last step as Sakima in this current form.

None


Photo courtesy of Sakima

]]>
Fri, 16 Aug 2019 16:10:39 +0000http://www.qladfj.tw/sakima-project-peach-2639826567.htmlSakimaSexLgbtqMatt Moen
Miley Cyrus Drops Break Up Bop 'Slide Away'http://www.qladfj.tw/miley-cyrus-slide-away-listen-2639856223.html

We only found out about Miley Cyrus and Liam Hemsworth's break up this week, when reps confirmed the split to People and Hemsworth later issued a statement on Instagram. But it would seem the on-off couple, who got married in 2018 after ten years of dating, have actually been separated for a while. Miley just went ahead and dropped a song explicitly about moving on from a long term relationship, and there's no way she wrote, recorded, and released it while simultaneously making out with Kaitlynn Carter in Italy.


None


Related | Nick Jonas and Miley Cyrus Still Have Love For Each Other

None


"Slide Away" is very sad and very catchy — an excellent addition to Miley's break up bop oeuvre. It's also explicitly about Hemsworth, who she famously met on the set of The Last Song in 2008. The lyrics detail how they grew apart over time: "Move on we're not 17/I'm not who I used to be/ You say that everything changed/ You're right, we're grown now."


None


Depending on which tabloid you read, Miley and Liam's break up was either amicable or explosive. Hemsworth's chill-but-poignant Instagram statement wishes Cyrus "health and happiness," but he's reportedly hurt by the paparazzi photos of her hooking up with Carter. Some outlets say that Miley's wild behavior drove Liam away from the relationship, while others argue it was Liam who was unwilling to put aside the drinking and drugs. Their friends and family supposedly expect them to get back together eventually, and it's true that we're yet to hear anything about a formal divorce.

None


What is the truth? We can only analyze the lyrics of this song and ponder. Listen to "Slide Away" by Miley Cyrus, below.


None


Photo via Getty

]]>
Fri, 16 Aug 2019 15:33:07 +0000http://www.qladfj.tw/miley-cyrus-slide-away-listen-2639856223.htmlMusicLiam hemsworthBreak upCelebrityThe last songSlide awayListenGossipThe hillsKaitlynn carterMiley cyrusKatherine Gillespie
This Makeup Artist Transformed Herself Into Peppa Pighttp://www.qladfj.tw/peppa-pig-makeup-tutorial-2639837184.html

In one of the strangest makeup tutorials ever made, makeup artist Jody Steel transforms herself into internet's favorite gay icon of the moment, Peppa Pig, who also happens to be a classic cartoon character.

None


"Hi, I'm Peppa Pig! Do you want to transform into Peppa too? For Halloween or for arts and crafts? Here is a family-friendly, realistic Peppa transformation," the video is captioned.

None


Related | How I Convinced the World My Replica Was Really Me

None


Starting with giant strokes of pink paint, Steele then goes on to cover parts of her face in black paint in order to create a wide gaping hole to resemble the mouth, which is equal parts fascinating and scary.

None


A few more simple moves, and voilà! Although the whole thing is frankly quite bizarre, the tutorial has generated thousands of views and is really just a testament to power of a simple makeup brush. But Twitter was mostly terrified.


None


"I just watched a Peppa Pig makeup tutorial and I am never sleeping again," one Twitter user who initially discovered and shared the video said.


None


"The deeper you go on that Peppa Pig makeup tutorial tweet the worse and weirder it gets. Just trust me and don't," another added.


None


Photo via YouTube

]]>
Fri, 16 Aug 2019 15:00:03 +0000http://www.qladfj.tw/peppa-pig-makeup-tutorial-2639837184.htmlPeppa pigJody steeleMakeup tutorialBeautyTransformationTwitterJeena Sharma
You’ve Never Heard a Voice Quite Like Bassette’shttp://www.qladfj.tw/bassette-interview-premiere-2639843541.html

The neo-R&B revolution is full of remarkable voices, from SZA's honeyed slur, to NAO's helium soprano, to Kehlani's anglic waterfall. But you've never heard one quite like Bassette's.

None


The 24-year-old singer's pipes are airy but dense, shy but powerful, with a gritty crystalline rasp undeniably reminiscent of Amy Winehouse. Her unidentifiable accent disarms hard consonants and wraps around endless vowels with a flirty warmth, that comes from the coordinates of her life. Bassette learned her first words on the island of Bermuda where she was born and lived until she was five, before moving to Scotland for several years, and finally to Sheffield, England. She's lived in the UK for 20 years, but birthplace and journey leaves their imprint on her loose, soft syllables.

None


Related | GoldLink Just Wants to Make People Dance

None


Since she moved to London for university after high school, dropping out shortly after to pursue music full-time, she's been using that voice to make brassy, R&B-pop with electronic flourishes, sometimes courtesy of her collaborator, electronic artist Joe Hertz, who gave her her start on his hit "Playing For You." Her new single "She Bad" introduces her debut EP, which is out later this year. It's a low-key R&B groove, with a euphoric, rattling pop chorus about a rare subject: romantic contentment. "One of the ones when he knows what I want before I know what I want/ Know no one's perfect/ He's pretty damn worth it/ Makes me want to give him the best I can offer," she sings, her creaking accent is particularly glorious on the "r" as she sings, "Boy he knows how to love me right, love me right/ Boy he knows how to love me raw."

None


The video, which PAPER debuts today, makes the song's sunshine literal. Bassette grins, dances, and grooves in the visual, directed London visual duo Fa and Fon, around London streets and a field of wildflowers at golden hour.

None


PAPER chatted with Bassette about her puzzling accent, London's music scene, and writing lovingly about love on her new album.


None


When did you realize you could sing?

I've always enjoyed singing. I've always enjoyed music from a young age. I think when I was around 10 or 11, that's when I first sang in front of people and that's when I realized that I could sing from people's reactions.

None


When and where was that?

I was around 10, at my best friend's house. I lived in Scotland at the time. It was around Christmas. She'd just got a Pop Idol CD, karaoke thing as a present. We were both singing and recording ourselves, and she was like: "Wow, you can actually sing!" and showed her whole family. Later in school, I did little talent shows here and there but didn't really take it seriously. When I was 19, I moved to London. That's when I got management and started going to studio. I started writing every day and taking it seriously and kind of perfecting my craft I guess. I've been pursuing it for about four years now.

None


How did you make your way to London?

Yeah, it was after high school. I came to London for university. I studied psychology for two years at uni, but I knew that I wanted to do music and I knew London was the place to do it. That's why I picked London University. After two years, I dropped out to focus on music just because it's my passion and I just love it. It was tough, all my friends were carrying on with Uni. My parents didn't really agree with it. I didn't really have a set plan or anything, but it had to be done.

None


Related | Sabrina Claudio: 'Being Vulnerable Is Not a Scary Thing'

None


What was growing up between Bermuda, Scotland, and England like? Where feels like home?

I think London definitely feels like home to me. Definitely. I just love the vibe of it. It's completely different to Bermuda. Bermuda is so small and there's not very many people and not a lot to do, but I do love Bermuda.

None


What is your relationship to Bermuda like?

I've been back twice, so I left Bermuda when I was 5 actually, but I've been back twice. I went back last year, saw my family, that was great. I do want to go back more often though. I want to go at least once a year now, it's just expensive.

None


Do you think growing up among different places affects your music? Were you inspired by different sounds and music scenes in those places?

In my house, we grew up listening to Soul and Motown... R&B music. I feel like maybe that molded me more than outside environments, to be honest. My parents used to listen to music around the house all the time. I also have an uncle who is a saxophone player and I have another uncle who is a drummer. They are quite established on the island... they're all in Bermuda.

None


None


Your story, of growing up between countries, is kind of the peg for you. Do you get tired of people knowing you for that, since you lived in England for so long? Or it makes sense, because it's a part of your story?

Yeah, it makes sense because it's a part of my story. And people ask anyway because of my accent, like I don't sound British even though I've been here most of my life, the majority of my life I've been there. Even at work, because I still work part-time, even at work people always ask me, "Oh, where are you from?" So it's an everyday thing for me, but it's like "I've been in the UK for 20 years." And when I say Bermuda, it's like "oh wow, the Bermuda Triangle." They always want to know more. So yeah, it's an everyday thing. I don't mind, it's cool.

None


What are the pieces of your accent? I've never talked to anyone who sounds like you.

It's so weird, because people always think I'm American, but when I speak to an American person, I'm clearly not American. A lot of people think I'm Canadian, some people pick up on Scottish, which is cool because I did live there, but I think it's just a mixture of everything to be honest. But my brother, sister and parents sound like me as well.

None


Why do you think you gravitate towards R&B? What are your thoughts on the kind of R&B renaissance we're in the middle of?

I think it's great. R&B music is great. It's good it's having a comeback. I gravitate to the soul element and how it just connects with you, emotionally. It's what I naturally gravitate towards. My new song, "She Bad," it's got kind of poppy elements to it, but I think the way I sing over it, it's more soulful than a pop song would be.

None


Related | NAO Gives Us Heaven and Earth

None


Totally, yeah. So tell me about "She Bad." It's such a joyful song, about being content. I feel so often, songs that sound like that are like: "He doesn't treat me right."

Yeah! "She Bad" is, as you said, a happy love song about being loved right. It's very positive. At the time, I was in a very positive mindset. It was exactly how I was feeling at that moment. I wrote it almost a year ago. I wrote it last August. It is about my boyfriend, actually. We're still together which is good. I still feel the same way [Laughs].

None


Wow! A happy story for once.

Yeah, yeah [Laughs].

None


So you wrote it a year ago. Looking back, how do you feel?

I'm just happy that it's out! 'Cause I remember writing it. I remember... I found the beat online actually. I reached out to a producer called RiverBeat, he's awesome. He's got really cool beats. He sent this beat to me and I wrote it super quickly, as well, like in one night I wrote the whole thing. I recorded it in a voice note in my phone and I sent it to my manager and he was like: "Yep. Record that. It's gonna to be your next single." a year later, we're finally releasing it. It feels great, I'm so happy to finally be getting it out there.

None


It does have this juicy pop chorus. Are you interested in exploring more pop sounds, or you want to stay rooted in R&B?

Yeah! I'm definitely open, I'm definitely open to... I want to explore everything, I'm so open to new things. I'm open.

None


None


What did you want to create with the video?

So, we worked with creative directors Fa and Fon, they're this sister duo in London and they're super cool, super creative. They wanted to create this fallen angel image. This angel falls from the sky and ends up in London, and she's lost and she finds who she is in the city, basically, she finds her wings again. So we filmed it on their farm actually, they grew up just outside of London. So we filmed it there, then the second half of the video is filmed in Dalston, London. It was all them, to be honest, they're great. They sourced all the styling, make-up and everything. It was all Fa and Fon.

None


Does "She Bad" point us in the direction of what's coming in the EP As far as the R&B-pop sound, and writing intimately about relationships? What is the EP about for you?

The EP is more love songs, but, love in a positive light. 'Cause as you said, all the songs out there show love in a negative, bad light, but it's not always like that. So my EP's definitely more positive, it's more happy, it's more, yeah, just being content with where you are at the moment, in relationships, with yourself. Yeah, it's more trap-y, pop, it's not too trap, it's not too pop, it's somewhere in between. I've written all my songs, I write everything myself. I source all the beats myself, and it's all me, pretty much.

None


You must get the SZA comparison all the time. But your songwriting style really did remind me of hers. Is she an inspiration?

Yeah! I love, love, love, love SZA, from her early music to now, I've been a huge fan from the beginning.

None


Related | The Rise of J. Cole's Dreamville Records

None


What kind of comparisons do you get for your voice?

I've had Amy Winehouse, but I feel like my voice is a lot softer than hers. Amy Winehouse is just, her own person, she's great. I've had Corinne Bailey Ray, Diana King...

None


This is your fullest project to date. What was most challenging for you about creating it?

So I'm releasing it completely independently. So me and my management created our own label, and all my songs I'm releasing myself. I've had to kind of create this business mindset, which I never used to have. I think that's been a challenge, just thinking more business-like I guess. But for the project, writing it, it was really straightforward for me. I just write everything myself, in my room, and if I'm happy with it, then cool!

None


Did you consider shopping your music around to labels? Or did you want to be independent?

I want to be independent. I want to just grow a bit more, before maybe a major comes on board. I want to put out at least two EPs, and a couple more singles myself, before having to get a major label on board. I want to just grow like that. And then eventually, it'll come to the point where I might need extra help. Mainly, I just want to have people connecting with my music, and connecting with what I write about and wanting to see me live and doing a lot of shows. After my projects, I just want to be doing a lot of shows and I want to be connecting with the people who listen.

None


Photography: Sebastian Burford

]]>
Fri, 16 Aug 2019 14:53:33 +0000http://www.qladfj.tw/bassette-interview-premiere-2639843541.htmlR&bSzaKehlaniNaoPopJoe hertzBermudaBassetteJael Goldfine
Kitten Captures 'Love, Longing and Anxiety' With 'Memphis'http://www.qladfj.tw/kitten-memphis-2639844884.html

To describe the staccato approach Kitten frontwoman Chloe Chaidez takes to singing the band's new track, "Memphis," as monotone would be a disservice to the power behind her vocals. Her tone is Avril-esque (and she even calls out the pop-punk princess), but despite the fact that the song has retro production elements, like the sampling of a dial-up loading screen, it's hyper-2019. There's a revival of '90s-cool-kid nonchalance going on in alt-rock right now, and "Memphis" shows that Kitten is ready to take it to new extremes.

None


Related | Charli XCX Is Pop's Cult Leader

None


It also seems as if nostalgia has gripped its fingerless mesh gloves on the pens of writers lately, with more and more hits pining over something lost. "Memphis" is all about this nostalgia, or better yet, the love in between the years lost to nostalgia. "I am a human/ Feel 64, feel 34, I'm 24," Chaidez sings over the steady thump of chords being thinned out by an acoustic grunge drum pattern.

None


None


With such a clear sonic vision, the visual for the track came naturally. "All of the love, longing, and anxiety present in the song translated beautifully to the screen," Chaidez says of the summery suburban video. It's not all smiles in Kitten's summer splendor, though, with a grittier side being exposed on rooftops and in backyards. "Tsarina Merrin, who directed, is our friend and go-to-photographer. She hangs out at the band's LA house almost every day, so she was able to capture a side of us that we haven't shown the world yet," Chaidez continues about the video. "I often feel the band tames my insanity, and I think that kind of relationship is what the song is about deep down."


None


"I'll never go back to Memphis," Chaidez concludes the song with a smile. The beat continues on, despite the definitiveness of the lyrics; the band jams on, while Chaidez dances around, cycling through smiles and frowns before posing with the Kitten family in the final scene.

None


Stream "Memphis" by Kitten, below, and follow them on Instagram (@kittentheband).


None


Photography: Abigail Tulis

]]>
Fri, 16 Aug 2019 14:35:03 +0000http://www.qladfj.tw/kitten-memphis-2639844884.htmlKittenMusicChloe chaidezAvril lavigneBrendan Wetmore
Whitney Port Says She Turned Down Leonardo DiCapriohttp://www.qladfj.tw/whitney-port-leo-dicaprio-2639846060.html

Whitney Port says that she once turned down a one-night stand with Leonardo DiCaprio.

None


That's right, The Hills: New Beginnings star apparently hung out with DiCaprio a couple times in 2009 — a juicy tidbit she revealed on best friend Andrea Cuttler's With Whit podcast earlier this week.

None


Related | Watch a Clip From MTV's The Hills: New Beginnings

None


"I have been dying to tell people this story for ages!" she said. "I feel like whenever I tell it to friends, no one believes me."

None


According to Port, this all went down in 2009 at NYC's Avenue club. Apparently, she and Cuttler had just met Rihanna (!!), when DiCaprio came over to her — which, naturally, led to a number exchange.

None


What followed was six months of texting and an eventual hang at Teddy's, which is where DiCaprio apparently made his move.

None


"He invited me back over to his house, and I said no," Port continued. "I was too nervous. I had never had a one-night stand. I didn't want to be with him alone."

None


Port, who was 24 at the time, says "it's really one of my bigger regrets in life," though she joked that, "If you didn't think I was cool, now you probably do."

None


That said, seeing as how Port has an adorable two-year-old son with her husband, Tim Rosenman, it seems like things worked out just fine.

None


Photo via Getty

]]>
Fri, 16 Aug 2019 00:37:14 +0000http://www.qladfj.tw/whitney-port-leo-dicaprio-2639846060.htmlWhitney portThe hillsThe hills: new beginningsLeonardo dicaprioFamous peopleSandra Song
Aidy Bryant Launches a Plus-Size Clothing Linehttp://www.qladfj.tw/aidy-bryant-pauline-2639845683.html

Attention fans of Shrill: If you've been loving Aidy Bryant's custom looks, get ready to reach for your wallet, because the SNL star has officially debuted a plus-size clothing line of her own.

None


Earlier today, Bryant took to her Instagram to announce the official opening of Pauline, which promises sizes ranging from 12 to 28. A project she first teased in 2017, Pauline's initial launch is starting with a limited run of a dress dubbed the "Lovington." Retailing for $175, the button-down dress (with pockets!!) comes in stripes, gingham, and a solid blue.

None


None


"I have been a fat lady my whole damn life…and I always felt like there were clothes out there, but not what I wanted," Bryant explained via a video on the website. "And what I wanted was something easy and simple and cool, but also comfortable."

None


Easy, simple, and cool, indeed. Check out the dress, here, and don't hesitate to grab one (or three) for yourself.

None


Photo via Getty

]]>
Fri, 16 Aug 2019 00:03:23 +0000http://www.qladfj.tw/aidy-bryant-pauline-2639845683.htmlAidy bryantSnlShrillFashionTvFamous peoplePlus sizePaulineSandra Song
Killer of Ashton Kutcher's Girlfriend?Found Guilty of Murderhttp://www.qladfj.tw/hollywood-ripper-guilty-1-2639845338.html

Michael Gargiulo — the man who killed Ashton Kutcher's then-girlfriend, Ashley Ellerin — has been found guilty on two counts of first degree murder and one count of attempted murder.

None


Labeled a "serial sexual-thrill killer" by prosecutors, Gargiulo (aka the "Hollywood Ripper" or "Chiller Killer") brutally murdered Ellerin in her Hollywood home, per KTLA. The crime, which happened in February 2001, happened on the night Ellerin was supposed to attend a Grammys afterparty with Kutcher.

None


Related | Hollyweird: Ashton Kutcher's Girlfriend Was Killed on Grammys Night

None


Kutcher, who took the stand against Gargiulo back in May, testified that he went to Ellerin's house around 10:45 p.m. to pick her up, but she never answered the door. He then apparently peered in through a side window before leaving, only to see what he believed was spilled red wine on the floor.

None


Ellerin was found the next morning by a roommate with more than 47 stab wounds. Gargiulo was also found guilty of the 2005 murder of Maria Bruno, as well as the 2008 attempted murder of Michelle Murphy, whose attack finally led to his apprehension, per the Los Angeles Times. Gargiulo also faces another murder charge in Illinois related to the 1993 death of teenager Tricia Pacaccio.

None


According to TMZ, the jury will now have to determine if Gargiulo was sane at the time of the killings.

None


Photo via Getty

]]>
Thu, 15 Aug 2019 23:10:40 +0000http://www.qladfj.tw/hollywood-ripper-guilty-1-2639845338.htmlAshton kutcherHollyweirdHollywood ripperFamous peopleAshley ellerinMichael gargiuloSandra Song
A History of Ariana Grande’s High Ponyhttp://www.qladfj.tw/ariana-high-ponytail-2639845063.html

Do we love an Ariana Grande childhood throwback? Yes, always. We adore. This afternoon the singer shared an exceptional one, featuring her trademark high pony. Turns out she's been rocking it for way longer than anyone thought.


None


The photo isn't dated, but this is definitely middle school or younger. The caption, "at least she's consistent," is cute but also a little misleading. While Ariana's hair has been painfully pulled back for years now, it's easy to forget that she experimented with different looks back in the day.

None


Below, a brief history of Ariana Grande's high pony — the most painful-looking hairstyle in pop music, and the second-most iconic after Lady Gaga's 2009-era wig bows.

The Broadway Years, 2007- 2008


None


None


Ariana's natural hair is dark, curly, and honestly very cute! Here she is on stage, starring in Broadway musical 13. Always fun to be reminded that, in an alternate non-Nickelodeon timeline, she's winning Tony awards and writing Playbill bios.

Cursed Redhead Era, 2009-2012


None


None


Here's where things go horribly wrong for Ariana's lush Italian locks. She's forced to bleach, dye, and straighten them every week for four years in order to play Cat Valentine in Nickelodeon's Victorious and, later, the spin-off Sam & Cat. She rocks the occasional pony, but rarely the instant facelift kind she's now known for.

The Ponytail Emergence, 2012-2014


None


None


None


As Grande explained in this long, very 2014 Facebook (she's a Twitter and Instagram girl now) post, the Nickelodeon years took their toll. The ponytail, it turns out, was actually a last resort — her hair was so damaged that sweeping it up and out of view was the only solution. Kind of like me in the office today! Except I'm fooling no one and Ariana is a 10.

Adventures in Extensions, 2014-2016


None


None


Kind of anything went during this strange era — music-wise, hair-wise, cat ear headband-wise. But we got a few high pony moments, most notably on the My Everything cover art.

Dangerous Ponytails, 2016-2017


None


None


Here, the ponytail really came into its own. Ari also experimented with bangs!

An Established Icon, 2018-present


None


None


These days, Grande's pony is starring in its own comedy sketches and Givenchy ads, featuring in memes, and occasionally even going platinum blonde. We'd barely recognize her without it — RIP Cat Valentine.

None


Photo via Getty

]]>
Thu, 15 Aug 2019 22:37:01 +0000http://www.qladfj.tw/ariana-high-ponytail-2639845063.htmlMusicFashionHairNickelodeonVictoriousNostalgiaHigh ponyInstagramSweetenerDangerous womanThank u nextMy everythingMac millerPete davidsonAriana grandeKatherine Gillespie
Reintroducing the Mullet: You Wanted It Back, You Got Ithttp://www.qladfj.tw/mullet-trend-tik-tok-2639838251.html

You asked for it, not me: the mullet's back, and it's having a full-blown revival. Welcome to Mulletville.

None


I hope Billy Ray Cyrus is happy with himself, because it seems as if #MulletPride is on the upswing thanks to his track, "I Want My Mullet Back," off of his 2006 album, Wanna Be Your Joe. A simple search for the audio on TikTok will leave you with an endless supply of lip syncs to the songs, in which users show off their luscious back-chopped hair in a variety of poses and situations. So, if you've got it, flaunt it — pull up your Ford F-150 and let those locks fly for the 'Tok, baby!


None


The trend is a bit of an oxymoron, though, considering Cyrus is pining for his old hairdo and not showing it off to begin with. Some have picked up on this, like one user's #TBT of her father. Despite sporting a dense mullet in his wedding photos, user @jrose.phil pans the camera to show him lusting after his old hair and promises that if the TikTok goes viral, he'll grow it back. There's no official word yet on whether or not he'll follow through, but with over 100k likes, it looks like it's about time.

None


There's really no way to tell exactly how the trend began, since unlike Lil Nas X's "Old Town Road," or other TikTok challenge songs before it, the "I Want My Mullet Back" has been around for over a decade. Perhaps the trend is kickstarting in the same way Lizzo's "Truth Hurts" did, despite being out since 2017. Renewed interest in Cyrus' discography might also be attributed to his feature on the remix of Lil Nas X's hit TikTok song. Despite its newfound resurgence in popularity, Wanna Be Your Joe as a whole is unfortunately unavailable on streaming services. "I Want My Mullet Back" is available on Apple Music and Spotify for streaming, however, under his 2017 album Set the Record Straight. Praise be the streaming gods.

None


None


The country mullet is only one subset of the larger mullet community that's gaining mass visibility at present, though, as can be seen in the hairstyle taking over New York this summer: the Bushwick mullet. With an unclear origin story and no actual metrics as to the trend, the Bushwick mullet is something of a new phenomenon that's collectively taken hold of Brooklyn and parts of downtown Manhattan.

None


The Bushwick mullet is less flowing and free-falling than the classic country mullet, as shown in the above TikToks. Simply put, it's more of a structured chop with less body and wave. Think about what the 2009 Justin Bieber haircut was to Zac Efron's High School Musical 'do — that's what the Bushwick mullet is to the country mullet. A simple search for "Bushwick mullet" on Google gives me tons of images of extremely accurate representations of the style, presumably sourced from hair salons based in New York, like Tomahawk Salon on Thames Street.

None


None


There truly are an endless amount of mullet sub-genres in addition to the country and Bushwick mullets; don't get me started on the very #20NineScene-esque reverse mullet. The trend truly shows no signs of stopping, multiplying and mutating endlessly until each of us ends up with a mullet, a TikTok account, and a playlist of only Billy Ray Cyrus. Actually, it sounds like a pretty good time. I'll have to mull it over for myself.


Photos via Getty

]]>
Thu, 15 Aug 2019 22:01:30 +0000http://www.qladfj.tw/mullet-trend-tik-tok-2639838251.htmlBilly ray cyrusMulletBrendan Wetmore
Fans Are Upset Over Britney Spears' $6,000 Louboutin Heelshttp://www.qladfj.tw/britney-spears-louboutins-2639844180.html

Britney Spears' Instagram presence remains a refreshing enigma. We literally never know what the superstar will post next.

None


But we know she's generous, whether she's sharing stories about her sons Jayden and Sean Preston, heaping praise on boyfriend Sam Asghari's culinary skills, et cetera. And if she's not on vacation or doing fashion shows to random pop songs, she's showing us the inside of her closet. Today, Spears posted a picture of a pair of Christian Louboutin heels that she's never worn. These snakeskin treasures were a cool $6,000. Her trash, our treasure, right? Apparently not so, says fans. Judging by the comments, many are upset because while the post is a bit of a humble brag, they feel it was generally irresponsible for her to say how much the luxury shoes cost.

None


"Britney, I don think u should be posting how much u pay for things," commented @magdasmusic. "Yes u can afford it and that's great but it might be a little insensitive to those that struggle each day."

@Eqrahhhh__ wrote, "If you wanted you could have fed the unprivileged with that money."

None


"Auction them off and donate the money to a non profit woman's cause," @realestatebyjamiemarquez wrote. "They are beautiful and shouldn't be kept in a box."

So basically, if fans have their say, Spears should definitely not sell her first pair of Loubs for quadruple the going-rate on eBay or The Real Real. That said, because capitalism still has its foot on all necks, I'm sure it's only a matter of time before someone launches the #BuyBritneysRedBottoms challenge.


None


Photo via Getty

]]>
Thu, 15 Aug 2019 21:55:55 +0000http://www.qladfj.tw/britney-spears-louboutins-2639844180.htmlChristian louboutinShoesFashionBritney spearsMichael Love Michael
Hey Stans, Have You Heard Robyn's 2007 Britney Spears Demo?http://www.qladfj.tw/robyn-britney-spears-piece-of-me-2639843232.html

Every day is a great day to stan your favorite pop queen. Seeing as how stans truly never rest, someone dug up Robyn's long-rumored demo of Britney Spears' "Piece of Me" and leaked it online.

None


As anyone who has ever listened to Blackout (read: all of you) knows, the song excellently summarizes Spears' unfortunate run of press circa 2007, the Year of the Lord Our Godney Went Apeshit. And if you take a closer look at the liner notes, it was written by Swedish pop architects, production duo Bloodshy & Avant, and songwriter Klas Ahlund, the former of whom once wrote a little-known song called "Toxic." But literally no one up until right now knew that Robyn actually did the original robo-vocals for the song that Britney would later make a middle-finger masterpiece about her relationship the media.

None


It's almost as if Robyn, Sweden's pop superhero, got, like, a distressed call from wherever in Sweden Spears was making the song and came to save the day. Whatever intervention took place obviously worked because, et voila, "Piece of Me" by Britney Spears exists, featuring backing vocals from Robyn! Anyway, hear Robyn drone solo over the beat, which still slaps till eternity. Now: when's the actual collab happening? Judging by Spears' recent status, it seems like never. But maybe not! There are some interesting internet conspiracies suggesting that Robyn's early pop career (and even her later maverick years) laid the groundwork for Spears' success, so the two might have more in common than what meets the eye.


None


And revisit the original, below:


Photo via screengrab

]]>
Thu, 15 Aug 2019 21:51:03 +0000http://www.qladfj.tw/robyn-britney-spears-piece-of-me-2639843232.htmlRobynPiece of meBlackoutMusicDemoMax martinBloodshy & avantBritney spearsMichael Love Michael
Behold Chace Crawford's Bulge in This 'The Deep' Adhttp://www.qladfj.tw/chace-crawford-the-deep-boner-2639843821.html

Chace Crawford stars in Amazon's new anti-superhero movie spoof The Boys, as a dirtbag ripoff of Aquaman named The Deep. He'll, of course, always be Nate Archibald from Gossip Girl to us, but it's making him relevant again, which is fun for everyone.

None


Related | NARS Wants You to Put a Dick to Your Lips

None


The Deep, a predatory superhero sell-out who mainly uses his superpowers to coerce women and get commercial modeling gigs, is a sharp pivot from Crawford's days playing the good-hearted, prep-school heartthrob. However, a new promo photo of him gloved in his green and gold spandex is making the world wonder if there's something we missed about Crawford all along. Namely, his enormous dick.

None


As you give him the up and down, in a new calendar photo, the eyes snag on shadows below his pecs and abs, and then on one around the groin. Unmistakably, the sundial shadow reveals a lengthy erect dickprint against his spandex, indicating 2:00PM.

None


Related | 'Fucking With Nature' Combines Photos of Iceland With Gay Porn

None


It's... truly... impressive. Whether the prominence of the actor's bulge intentional (to go along with The Deep's playboy character) or simply unavoidable (you can hear the photog: "uh... should we edit it out?"), the internet is really enjoying themselves. If it wasn't intentional, maybe The Boys team should grab a few pairs of Pornhub's boner-disguising swim trunks for their next shoot.





None


Upon further inspection of The Boys promo materials, Chace's "meatshadow" — a term I learned today while reading through this Twitter frenzy — sometimes appears. Like here:


None


And sometimes, the actor's goods appear are more subtly camouflaged.


None


I, for one, will be heading binging The Boys this weekend, as further research on this matter.


None


Photo via Twitter

]]>
Thu, 15 Aug 2019 21:44:57 +0000http://www.qladfj.tw/chace-crawford-the-deep-boner-2639843821.htmlThe boysThe deepDickBonerGayChace crawfordNsfwJael Goldfine
Ms. White Is Letting It All Gohttp://www.qladfj.tw/ms-white-jaded-2639839307.html

Our initial introduction to Ms. White might have come at the recent announcement of queer label Flat Pop Records, but the label's flagship artist has made music since she first discovered trailblazing talents from Amy Winehouse to Erykah Badu.

None


Related | Queer Label Flat Pop Records: Transforming the Music Biz

None


Ms. White's eclectic sound is inspired by the music she loved as a young trans girl growing up in Baltimore, from ragtime and video games soundtracks to the jazz sung by revolutionary women she admired later on, as heard on her 2017 EP, Jade.

None


Ms. White's most recent, ultra-sexy single "Jaded" features booming trip-hop beats, a robust string section, and a voice that feels timeless. The song's lyrics capture the complex Ms. White's feeling of being scorned in love, while realizing that she too, plays a part. The Peter Walker-directed video, premiering today on PAPER, makes literal the many parts she plays. "If we're not exclusive then why are we doing this?" she wonders, caught in a vicious cycle.

None


None


For the "Jaded" video, Ms. White attempts to shed the shame of her trauma by letting loose. In the video, she is shown dancing and writhing in varied scenes, from beach to NYC rooftop. Though she wears the same look, through movement, Ms. White embodies the multiple personae humans adopt, whether they are making ill-fated relationships work or sorting through unpredictable trauma.

None


"There is a moment in every person's life when we have the opportunity to recognize we're in our own way," Ms. White explains. "It's easy to recognize when other people or circumstances have hurt you, but it's difficult to discern — let alone admit and accept — that sometimes you are the problem. 'Jaded' is a dedication to the moment I realized that I had let life get the best of me, and I let the fear of addressing tragedy and trauma seep into my actions."

None


In that aspect, the video also acknowledges her New York home, and its inherently Darwinian nature. You're either in or you're out, get in or get lost. Ms. White faces herself, flaws and all. As she says, "I wanted it to be clear that underneath the surface, art is a sensory expression of what it means to be alive. I wanted the video to capture someone finally letting go."

None


Stream Ms. White's Jade EP below, and follow her on Instagram (@mswhitexoxo_).


None


Photography: M. Cooper

"Jaded" Video Credits:
Director: Peter Walker
Editor: Sophie Solomon
Colorist: Alex Jimenez
1st AD: Lena Lobel



]]>
Thu, 15 Aug 2019 19:29:30 +0000http://www.qladfj.tw/ms-white-jaded-2639839307.htmlFlat pop recordsMusicMusic videoPremiereJadedJadeMs. whiteMichael Love Michael
Watch Cardi B Take Bernie Sanders to a Nail Salonhttp://www.qladfj.tw/cardi-b-bernie-sanders-video-2639840423.html

Cardi B and Bernie Sanders have forged an unlikely friendship over the past couple months, after first interacting on Twitter. Today, they posted a campaign video filmed in Detroit salon Ten Nails, with Cardi asking the popular Democratic candidate policy questions submitted by her many followers.


None


The video acts as a primer for young voters unfamiliar with Sanders's main platforms: universal healthcare, canceling all student debt, free public college education, addressing issues around race and police brutality, taxing Wall Street, expanding DACA, improving worker conditions, and increasing the minimum wage. (You know: literally everything that would fix America.) "We have this bully as a president and the only way to take him out is somebody winning," Cardi B begins. "I want to tell my millions of followers: We're here to educate you guys."

None


Cardi B frequently and effectively brings her personal experiences into the discussion, speaking as a member of the Latinx community and as someone who has struggled to make rent while earning minimum wage in the past. "As a New Yorker — not now but when I was not famous — I felt like no matter how many jobs I get I wasn't able to make ends meet," she says.

None


The two go on to talk about, among other things, a shared love of Franklin Delano Roosevelt — he's Cardi's favorite President, although Sanders hopes to change that come 2020.

None


The video ends on Sanders making a plea for youth voter registration: "Cardi, can I just say one thing before we get off? A lot of people moan and groan, right? They don't like Donald Trump, they don't like the low wages, they don't like spending 50 percent of their income on housing, they don't like student debt, they don't like the fact they can't go to college. But all of that moaning and groaning and complaining doesn't mean anything unless we change the system, okay? Young people have got to get involved in the political process." Earlier in the video, he also refers to Trump as "an overt racist."

None


Related | Ariana Grande and Barbra Streisand Went to the Nail Salon Together

None


It says a lot that the Sanders campaign saw an opportunity in Cardi B, who obviously has millions of young fans to mobilize but is also an unpredictable figure known for speaking her mind on social media. Though she has been publicly feeling the Bern since 2016, you get the feeling that if Sanders said or did something she disagreed with, Cardi would happily call him out. He's presumably comfortable with that.

None


Politics aside, let's consider the fact Sanders and Cardi went to a nail salon in the first place. It's extremely funny! They should have taken it further and gotten him a manicure, but whatever! We can't have everything. As the Democratic candidate acknowledged, "Cardi's nails are just a little bit different from mine," but "our views on the issues are pretty similar."

None


Watch the entire video, below.


None


Screenshot via YouTube

]]>
Thu, 15 Aug 2019 19:10:57 +0000http://www.qladfj.tw/cardi-b-bernie-sanders-video-2639840423.htmlBernie sanders2020 electionDonald trumpDetroitFeel the bernHealthcareEducationPolice brutalityRacismDacaMinimum wageYoutubeVideoWatchMusicNail salonCardi bKatherine Gillespie
The End Is Nigh: Tinder and Bumble Are Sponsoring Frat Houseshttp://www.qladfj.tw/tinder-bumble-fraternities-2639838092.html

Quick, have a moral panic: two awful places for women, frat houses and dating apps, are teaming up.

None


According to a new report from the Houston Chronicle, the evil genuises over at Tinder and its "feminist" counterpart Bumble are doing a university marketing push that includes inviting frat houses to sign exclusive contractual sponsorships. The apps are sending cash goodies to frat houses, in exchange for them swearing off competitors, and sometimes, throwing Tinder or Bumble-sponsored parties, where attendees are required to download and sign up for the app in order to get in.

None


Related | What The Tinder Trap Really Reveals

None


"Simply scan to enroll!," read a poster hanging outside a UT Austin frat house, explaining that all attendees "Must: be within five miles of campus, be ages 18-22, have an existing Tinder profile, have UT Austin in your profile."

None


Tinder has created a specific "Tinder U" service just to make finding people at your school simpler. The apps, according to fraternity members the Chronicle spoke with, provide money to cover production costs for parties, branded signage and swag for their parties. Then, all they have to do in turn, is hang up the sign. On top of that, while frats are apparently contracted a certain sum of money for throwing a sponsored party, they can earn additional money based on the number of students who download the app at ticket pickup.

None


Related | Tinder Launches Festival Mode For Fest Hookups

None


These app-surveilled and sponsored parties are confirmed to have taken place at Oklahoma University, Tulane University and Northwestern University, as well as University of Texas, but both Bumble and Tinder declined to share with the Chronicle how many campuses they're operating on, or how much cash these deals offer frats.

None


Eek! Okay, so the panic isn't about these contracts turning frat parties into dystopic IRL dating app game shows, but any situation where the culture of Tinder and the culture of frat houses are reinforcing each other, just... can't... be... good.

None


For one, forcing 18-24 year-olds to become a user of an app (particularly one that collects their data, and particularly where sexism and racism are rampant) order to get into a party are definitely questionable marketing tactics. Young adults in that age range are reportedly the company's biggest area for potential growth, and they're perfectly willing to exploit some lunkhead frat bros to do it.

None


Related | Grindr Wants To Tackle Discrimination

None


But, of course, said bros don't feel like they're being exploited, or don't seem to care. One brother told Chronicle that the partnerships "mutually beneficial." Right, of course they are. The apps get automatic access to hundreds of new users, and bros — as they furrow their brows over whether their identity is more a Tinder house or a Bumble house — get to mechanize their dangerous hook-up culture, even further. App-required parties get hook-ups down to a science, and provide a guarantee: to enter, you have to be down to fuck, or at least digitally accessible for inquiries.

None


RIP simpler times, where where you just had to spiritually resign yourself to the male gaze and get semi-consensually grinded on in order to attend a college party, instead of having to put your photos and data into an app for consideration.

None


Photo via Getty

]]>
Thu, 15 Aug 2019 17:15:51 +0000http://www.qladfj.tw/tinder-bumble-fraternities-2639838092.htmlFraternitiesUniversity of texasBumbleTinderJael Goldfine
Vera Hotsauce's 'One Time' Is a Glimmering Pop Gemhttp://www.qladfj.tw/vera-hotsauce-one-time-2639837219.html

For all those hoping that the one-night-stand you had last weekend will have a revival come next Friday, this one's for you: Vera Hotsauce's "One Time" is your only synth-pop remedy.

None


"'One Time' is very straight forward," Hotsauce says of the new track. "It's about wanting something so bad even though you know it's not gonna go anywhere, you just really hope that it might."

None


It's hard not to compare the track to its same-named predecessor by Justin Bieber, in both production and maturity. While the JB hit was also created in the same vein of purified pop, distilled to foundational concepts of only the best falsetto whines and gleams, it's not nearly as layered as Hotsauce's shimmery track.

None


None


Hotsauce may think that "One Time" is straightforward, but it packs a story-laden punch. It's at once sexual, implying all things "one night stand"-related, but also cutesy and coy. It's as if there's a game being played between potential lovers on top of the beating-heart synths. There may be only one outcome to the game in the end, but it doesn't stop the back-and-forth of Hotsauce's lyrics, demonstrating that despite all, the lovers play on.

None


Related | Vera Hotsauce Channels Gwen Stefani on 'Hey Boy'


"Every time you go down that road, you tell yourself, 'this is the last time,' but it always happens again," she says. Thankfully enough for listeners, Hotsauce went down that road again, providing an experience that's both retro and yet somehow extremely new. A synth-pop revival is obviously taking place on alt-radio currently, with artists like The 1975 at the helm and laying down some of their more jovial-sounding hits in recent years. Hotsauce's "One Time" comes in, then, as both a participating member and a response to the revival. The track indulges in '80s sounds, yes, but takes cues from the Top 40 of the 2010s and makes pop simple and fun to listen to for a listening experience that's 100% guilt-free.

None


Check out "One Time," below, and follow Vera Hotsauce on Instagram (@verahotsauce).


None


Photo courtesy of Vera Hotsauce

]]>
Thu, 15 Aug 2019 17:11:37 +0000http://www.qladfj.tw/vera-hotsauce-one-time-2639837219.htmlVera hotsauceMusicBrendan Wetmore
Doja Cat's 'Juicy' Is For Cherry Emoji Twitterhttp://www.qladfj.tw/doja-cat-tygajuicy-2639838434.html

Other than Doja Cat posing as a cut in half as a watermelon — it just looks painful — every look from her new video for "Juicy" is on my list of potential fruit-inspired Halloween costumes. Cherries and peaches in tow, Doja Cat is capitalizing on the popularity of her newest TikTok hit from her debut record Amala and giving it a revamp. Not only did "Juicy" get its own video, but it now features a new verse from Tyga that wasn't originally on the record.

None


"Juicy" isn't Doja Cat's only track to get some well-deserved TikTok attention, with her twinning anthem, "Tia Tamera," featuring fellow rapper Rico Nasty, also going viral on the lip-syncing platform. It seems that TikTok is also wise to Doja's unique awareness of what goes viral and what doesn't, since the app makes several spon con appearances in the new video. Why wouldn't they? The song epitomizes everything the platform's about: it's short, bouncy, and just a little controversial. Let the #JuicyChallenge ensue.

None


Not to mention, Cherry Emoji Twitter is probably having a fit right now with all of the glossy cherry-inspired looks Doja's rocking in the video. From bare naked with a 3D-rendered cherry covering her cheeks, to a cutesy red bodysuit with a campy headpiece, "Juicy" will truly have e-girls and e-boys alike talking for awhile — or at least until Doja's next album drops.


Image via YouTube

]]>
Thu, 15 Aug 2019 16:01:50 +0000http://www.qladfj.tw/doja-cat-tygajuicy-2639838434.htmlTygaFruityDoja catBrendan Wetmore
Matt Healy Kisses Fan Onstage to Protest Dubai Homosexuality Banhttp://www.qladfj.tw/matty-healy-kiss-dubai-2639838884.html

The 1975's Matty Healy, always an ally, kissed a male fan on the lips during the band's Dubai concert last night in order to protest anti-LGBTQ laws in the UAE. Social media footage shows him going in for the kiss then asking the crowd, "We're all human, right?"

None


The UAE is notoriously homophobic; sodomy is punishable by up to ten years imprisonment. In the past, both lesbian and gay couples have been jailed for displaying affection publicly in Dubai. In 2017, a trans woman tourist was sentenced to a year in prison for "imitating a woman" in Abu Dhabi.

None


Related | Watch The 1975 Call Out Misogyny in Music

None


On Twitter after the show, Healy noted that he might not be allowed back in the country after so flagrantly mocking its laws. But, he added, "We'll see." The musician often uses his massive platform for good, having donated to LGBTQ causes in the past, spoken out against misogyny in the music industry, and helped raise awareness of climate change by featuring Greta Thunberg on new album Notes On A Conditional Form. While stopping short of labeling himself bisexual, the singer has stated that he's attracted to men as well as women.


None


Related | Should Musicians Charge for Meet and Greets? The 1975 Say No

None


Appropriately, Healy chose his moment during a rendition of "Loving Someone." The kiss goes on for longer than you'd think, and luckily the random dude appears to enjoy it, although some fans are now concerned that he could be prosecuted by local authorities for engaging in a homosexual act on camera.

None


Photo via Getty

]]>
Thu, 15 Aug 2019 15:41:38 +0000http://www.qladfj.tw/matty-healy-kiss-dubai-2639838884.htmlMatt healyMatty healyMusicLgbtqUbaiUnited arab emiratesUaeSodomy lawsHomophobiaHomosexualityNotes on a conditional formGreta thunbergThe 1975Katherine Gillespie
Marion Belle and Sam Mehran Want You to Strip to 'Bad Bitches'http://www.qladfj.tw/marion-belle-sam-mehran-melt-2639827212.html

In the winter of 2018, Los Angeles musicians Marion Belle and Sam Mehran, who co-founded the band Test Icicles, came together to work on a collaborative EP. Later in July of that same year Mehran would tragically die by suicide, leaving the project partially unfinished. With the help of Teengirl Fantasy's Nick Weiss, Belle has gone on to complete the project, naming it "Melt" after a single word found in Mehran's journal after his death.

None


"'Bad Bitches' was one of the first songs we wrote after a label set us up to write songs together," Belle says. "Sam is a legend, someone who in his way forever changed pop music for the better, and was just getting started. We fell hard for each other. I know we both thought it was some of the best music we'd ever made."

None


Related | Teddy Geiger Is Ready For the World

None


Following "Way of Life," the second single off Melt's forthcoming EP, "Bad Bitches," is a slinky little guitar-driven pop tune about being drawn, like a moth to a flame, to those who live life fast and loose. It's accompanied by an Abigail Briley Bean-directed music video that focuses on the trials and tribulations of a young baton twirler rehearsing a trick and repeatedly failing before taking a dark Suspiria-like turn at the end. "The story it tells is of someone who cares so deeply about something that they will endure pain for it," Belle says of the visual. "They get satisfaction from the pain."

None


Lyrically, Bell says "'Bad Bitches' is about those people with the burning fire, like Sam, who will break your heart. For a long time I didn't have the verses. But they finally came to me in the parking lot of this strip club in east Hollywood, after getting a day drink with a friend. It was very important to Sam and I that people strip to this song."


None


Marion Belle and Sam Mehran Present: MELT, arrives August 16 via Total Decay

None


Photo courtesy of Marion Belle

]]>
Thu, 15 Aug 2019 15:33:37 +0000http://www.qladfj.tw/marion-belle-sam-mehran-melt-2639827212.htmlSam mehranMeltBad bitchesRockPopTest iciclesSuicideAvery richardsonStrippingStrippersHollywoodLaNick weissDev hynesMarion belleMatt Moen
Kourtney Kardashian Shows Off Her Stretch Markshttp://www.qladfj.tw/kourtney-kardashian-stretch-marks-2639828408.html

Kourtney Kardashian is getting a lot of love on social media for an unedited photo spotlighting her stretch marks.

None


Yesterday, the Instagram account for Kardashian's recently-launched lifestyle website, Poosh, wanted to promote an exercise article. The photo they used? A lovely pic of Kardashian herself in a high-cut one-piece swimsuit posing on a boat.

None


Related | Poosh Calling: Kourtney Kardashian Takes Time Out For Herself

None


Notably, her upper thigh and booty stretch marks are front-and-center — a little detail that didn't escape the attention of fans.

None


"Proud hot mama!" one user wrote, while another person commented, "Oh wow, not air brushed. You can actually see her stretch marks and this is what a real body looks like! I love it!" Meanwhile, others praised her for helping them embrace their own stretch marks, with some even marveling at the fact that there were, "Stretch marks! On a Kardashian!!"

None


And it looks like Kardashian was feeling the love. In response to a fan thanking her for not editing out her stretch marks, Kardashian responded with an adorable smiley face alongside the comment, "I love my little stripes."

None


Aw, talk about cute. See the post for yourself, below.

None


None


Photo via Getty

]]>
Thu, 15 Aug 2019 00:19:01 +0000http://www.qladfj.tw/kourtney-kardashian-stretch-marks-2639828408.htmlKourtney kardashianBody positivityStretch marksPooshFamous peopleSandra Song
Megan Thee Stallion Was Made for Thishttp://www.qladfj.tw/megan-thee-stallion-2639723905.html

It's late July, and I'm stalking Megan Thee Stallion's Instagram and Twitter accounts. I feel like a fucking creep, but we're supposed to be meeting at the 300 label offices in Manhattan; Megan's canceled flight out of North Carolina foils those plans. Instead, I watch her pass the time in the airport with her team before eventually getting on an evening flight. For the next six days, I watch her social profiles as she bounces from the East Coast to the West Coast, back to the East Coast then right back to the West Coast. In Miami, she's meeting with superproducer DJ Khaled; in San Francisco, she's performing for her Cali "Hotties," the nickname she's given members of her fast-growing fan base.

None


While Megan flits across the country, I'm locked into email and text threads, where additional arrangements to meet in person break down. Megan has a schedule to keep — a missed flight is unfortunate, but she can't hustle backwards. She has collaborations to secretly record, relationships to nurture, shows to act up at (and pop up at, like Drake's OVO Fest), and most of all, new friends to make, as she promotes her "Drive the Boat" agenda, which sees her pouring alcohol directly into the mouths of her industry peers, like SZA, Trina, Lizzo, and Kamaiyah (others like Kehlani, Wiz Khalifa, and Diplo have elected to take their own shots alongside her).

None


Related | Lil Nas X on a Unicorn Floatie

None


When Megan's publicist finally locks in a time for our call, I'm not surprised that it's for that exact moment. She connects us, one week after our previously scheduled meeting, and Megan greets me with her sopping Southern drawl. She informs me that she's at a video shoot in L.A. "I don't want to get too much into details, because it's not mine," she says in a friendly voice, with a hint of caution.

None


None


I ask her what she's been up to over the past week. "Just writing and doing shows all over the place," she says. "It's hectic, like usual."

None


As much power as the word "hectic" holds, it doesn't sufficiently capture the kind of lifestyle Megan is now balancing. In less than a year, the 24-year-old Houston rapper and Texas Southern University student has gone from local fave kicking viral cypher freestyles on rooftops, to performing at jam-packed solo shows in Europe. "I'm like, '[The fans] aren't going to know the words,'" she recalls thinking ahead of her overseas shows. "They was in there, word for word. It was amazing. Finland — I have Hotties in Finland! It blows my mind every time I go somewhere new and they're so turnt up. I just love it."

None


None


Megan Thee Stallion's quick rise from newcomer to top dog in hip-hop was expedited by a concoction of planning and prowess: instead of dropping it in January, like she originally announced, Megan released her stellar third mixtape Fever on May 17, mere weeks before the summer solstice, and christened the months of June, July, and August as Hot Girl Summer. "Being a Hot Girl is about being unapologetically YOU," Megan explained on Twitter on July 17. "Having fun, being confident, living YOUR truth, being the life of the party etc."

None


After its conceptual introduction, Hot Girl Summer quickly grew legs and sprawled over into Hot Boy Summer, setting off a playful war of the genders on social media and IRL. (It should be noted that the term Hot Girl Summer is non-gendered.) "I don't know what made it a competition," Megan says, laughing. "It was the stupid boys. It just turned into a whole big ol' thing. Now if it was a competition, I would definitely say that the Hot Girls have been in the lead. The Hot Boys is acting up... they showing some very ratchet behavior that has not been that cute. They talking about they wins and they doing grimy stuff. I'm like, 'No baby, that's not how you get points.'"

None


Megan is a walking Swiss Army knife of entertainment. Her Instagram follower count is 3.7 million and counting, and her Twitter posts frequently take off, receiving likes and retweets in the hundreds of thousands. Her livestreams inspire myriad memes and reaction photos, and her freestyles have become just as well known as homemade videos of her twerking on stage at her concerts.





None


A recent clip, which made the rounds on pretty much every social platform there is, features Megan rapping to "Freak Nasty," a standout album cut from her 2018 project Tina Snow. Wearing a lime green cropped hoodie and matching, ass-out chaps and heels, she sinks down into a squatting position and proceeds to twerk expertly for 15 seconds straight, a feat that any woman — or man — can tell you isn't easy to pull off. In the background of the video, you can hear the crowd screaming in delight like they do in every city she performs in; meanwhile, her fans online zeroed in on a particular body part.

None


"They keep asking me about my knees," she says, cracking up. "I be like: 'Well you know, just drinking a lot of water...'" I cut her off right there. "Is that really the secret to the knees?" I ask. "I don't know how that's going to work for everybody else, but it works for me," she responds, without a hint of sarcasm. "Drink a lot of water. Drink some orange juice. Eat your vegetables. Drive a boat."



None


In other words, this shit comes naturally to Megan. She prides herself on her long-standing commitment to fitness, and her unaltered body, which has in some ways become just as much a part of her brand as her voice. When she explores mixed martial arts with fellow gym rat Wiz Khalifa, we collectively marvel, as a video he posted to Instagram shows the pair doing on June 11; when she twerks on Teyana Taylor on June 25 while a cheesy Trey Songz awkwardly gawks in the background, we pant together.

Everybody wants a piece of Thee Stallion.

None


While every famous woman, living or dead, is subject to speculation and commentary on her body, debates about Megan's have sprouted up on social media with even more regularity than most: for example, one side defends handsy fans of Megan, who grab at her while she's performing; the other side says they should keep their hands to themselves. I ask Megan if she minds the attention she receives, and she sounds unperturbed. "It doesn't bother me," she explains. "The only time it probably would bother me a little bit is if the venue is too crowded. They all trying to touch me at one time, now they're getting into it, you know what I'm saying? Stuff like that, but no. Let's have a good time."

None


None


A good time in the Hot Girl Universe is objectification of the highest order. "Real fuckin' hot girl shit, bitch," she advises listeners at the top of "Shake That," a fan favorite from Fever. "Real fuckin' ratchet shit, bitch/ Come in the club and get it clapping and shit, bitch." She's matter-of-fact and demanding, like a personal trainer you could never afford.

None


Her "Shake That" instructions were clear enough to get the attention of Miley Cyrus, who posted a clip of herself twerking to the song in mid-July. "It's lit," Megan says when I ask for her thoughts on Cyrus's endorsement. "We want all the Hot Girls we can get. For me, watching Hannah Montana... for Miley Cyrus to be having a Hot Girl Summer, I'm like, 'Damn. That's amazing!'"

None


Related | Women Have Always Rapped About Sex

None


In addition to Cyrus, public figures like Kylie Jenner have been seen blasting Megan's music, and brands like Wendy's and Maybelline have used "Hot Girl Summer" in social posts to support the movement, or more likely, to join the discussion in attempts to keep their companies relevant. On July 22, reports stated that Megan would be filing to trademark the term. I ask her how far along she's gotten with making the phrase hers. "It's going — it's not a day process," she explains. "I didn't even think that it would be something that was this big. I just be talking. The Hotties run with it and love it, now everybody is a Hottie. I'm flattered. I appreciate it: spread the awareness, spread the movement."

None


None


Megan's ability to drive a pop culture-dominating moment is tied directly to the confidence she radiates at any particular moment. She inherited her self-assurance and rapping skills from her mother, the late Holly Thomas, who rapped under the name Holly-Wood when Megan was a young girl. Eventually, she followed in her mother's footsteps.

None


"We used to be in the car, going back and forth all the time," Megan says of her time spent battle rapping her mother. I tell her straight up that it seems like she was born to be a rap star, given her familial background and the musical influence gushing out of the city and state in which she was raised. She takes a deep breath.

None


"Sis," she begins. "I feel like off the strength that my mom was a rapper, and the music that her and my dad put in my ear as a child, it was bound to happen. Me watching her write and me watching her go in the studio and lay her verses down. Just to see how dedicated she was, that was normal to me. That just became the thing that I saw around my house. We bumping Pimp C, we listening to Three 6 all the time, we listening to Biggie. You know what I'm saying? I've always been a big fan of music. Just me growing up and turning into Meg Thee Stallion, this is a product of my environment."

None


Megan's transition from hometown hero to international entertainer has been nearly seamless. She's arrived at a point that a Beyoncé collaboration is within her reach ("Just pray for me," she says), and a Rihanna collab is at the top of her brain. "I love Rihanna," she says. "The Bad Girl and the Hot Girl, that would be something."

None


None


Her name rings out on such a level that she's being positioned by fans and hip-hop media as the figure who could make a new version of "Ladies Night," the 1997 Lil' Kim-helmed woman-focused posse cut, happen. "You know, I've been hearing it," she says. "I've been seeing it. Now, I really want it to be a thing. If it were up to me, we would literally have 20 motherfuckers on the song."

None


Even with 20 people on a track, you could pick Megan's voice out of the lineup in an instant. Her voice, with its authoritative lower register, stands out amongst the group of women who are dominating hip-hop this year. Through a laser-like focus on her own career, and a general "fuck you" to anyone trying to instigate drama or affect her trajectory, she's managed to dodge the trope of beefing with other female rappers that others have had pushed on them. On July 28, during a joint Instagram Live with Nicki Minaj, Megan spoke out about how some are positioning her against Minaj, due to her rising status. "Stop playing with Nicki Minaj like she ain't the motherfucking GOAT," Megan says with passion. "Don't ever ask me shit: don't ever question me. You know the fucking vibes, quit playing with us."

None


That unbridled honesty is reflected in "Realer," the opening track of Fever, which starts with Megan delivering the hardest bars many of us had heard from her thus far: "Say, nigga! I don't wanna talk/ Meet me at the bank, show me what you really 'bout!" She sounds like she would make a potential sugar daddy quake in his boots while handing over his wallet.

None


Related | Break the Internet: Nicki Minaj

None


"My voice is a little deeper," she admits. "When I talk, I have to mean what I say and say what I mean. The point has to be clear across. I don't want to use a squeaky voice, because I need you to know I'm being deadass serious." As she says this, she chuckles.

None


Her voice shifts from amiable to hesitant when I ask if she can tell me anything about her new single, "Hot Girl Summer," set to drop on August 9 with Nicki Minaj and Ty Dolla $ign.

None


"There is so much going on with this song," she says. "But I literally think I'm going to extend the summer until October. I think I can do that. Fuck it. Why not?"


None


Photography: Arturo Evaristo
Photo Assistant: Malik Peay
Stylist: Sarah Toshiko West
Stylist: Casey "iCON" Billingsley
Hair: Alonzo Arnold
Makeup: Alissa Zinnerman
Cover Illustrator: Harry Zafar





]]>
Thu, 08 Aug 2019 15:06:57 +0000http://www.qladfj.tw/megan-thee-stallion-2639723905.htmlFeverHot girl summerMeg the stallionHottiesMegan thee stallionNicki minajStory Kiana Fitzgerald / Photography Arturo Evaristo / Styling Sarah Toshiko West
Lil Nas X on a Unicorn Floatiehttp://www.qladfj.tw/lil-nas-x-unicorn-floatie-2639677075.html

"France looks exactly how it does in the movies," Lil Nas X reports, settling deeper into one of the sturdy plastic chairs lining our neon-lit bowling lane. Even though he's been on set all day and has an early-ish call time for a top secret music video shoot the next day, Nas still manages to seem at ease, offering a warm, toothy grin to our waitress, who is clearly very excited to be taking his order, which consists of a battery of fried foods including chicken fingers, popcorn shrimp and buffalo cauliflower. Between dispatching advice on the best bowling practices — apparently releasing your thumb first helps with your aim — he's brimming with hilariously candid observations on Europe, having recently returned from his first out of the country trip. Across the pond, the rising star made stops in France and England, where he made paninis with Gordon Ramsay and then chopped them in half with a medieval axe (in honor of his charting single, "Panini"), and performed in front of a crowd of more than 180,000 at Glastonbury Festival.

None


As far as once in a lifetime experiences go, the 20-year-old, born Montero Lamar Hill in the small town of Lithia Springs, Georgia, agrees that it's all been "pretty sick." From an outsider's perspective it also seems dizzyingly sudden, but that's also just the way fame tends to manifest itself in the internet age. The formula seems simple enough: an aspiring, down-on-his-luck musician anonymously buys a $30 beat and makes a catchy bop worthy of launching a thousand memes and viral videos garnering views in the millions. Yet if the science of hype were as uncomplicated or as formulaic as Lil Nas X has made it appear, wouldn't we all be more famous?

None


None


Even for Nas, whose juggernaut single "Old Town Road" is currently enjoying a record-breaking run of 18 weeks on the Billboard Hot 100 chart, chasing fame has been a series of Mellevillian almosts in which he's had brushes with the great white whale, but never quite captured it. "I've gone viral several times already," he says. "It might not have been my face, but I know what it feels like to have my thoughts being seen everywhere." Even before his emergence as a lovable and eccentric musician with a knack for creating shareable content, Nas appears to have been behind several viral moments — some of which can still be found in internet archives. Although he's declined to comment and his team has since distanced him from the account, Nas' online footprint indicates that he was very likely the curator behind the now-defunct @NasMaraj handle, which spawned several viral tweets, including one that went on to be picked up as a Buzzfeed story in 2017.

None


The fictional tweet, which racked up more than 11,000 retweets and 23,000 likes, shows a picture of a sad dog allegedly named Doug, whose birthday party no other dogs attended. At the time of the Buzzfeed article the person behind the account identified themselves as 17-year-old Nasiir Williams of Atlanta, and claimed that he'd fabricated the story out of boredom. Despite having seemingly provided an alias, the location and age are a match; Nas is now 20, so he would have been 17 and residing in Atlanta in 2017. Furthermore, it seems particularly likely it was indeed him when one considers that archives show the @NasMaraj account, which enjoyed a six-figure following at its peak, largely due to publishing a series of interactive scenario threads, featured a profile photo of Nas at one time. In addition to its wholesome dog stories, the page also tapped into more edgelord style practices, often tweeting content that would be considered off-tone today; that is perhaps why Nas' team has been so determined to minimize his alleged involvement.

None


Related | Lil Nas X Inspires a New Reckoning in Country Music

None


Still, as he secures a clunky, multicolored bowling shoe to each foot, Nas, seems to have grown into understanding the responsibility of having such sudden influence, particularly when his face and name are attached. "I do try to stay positive online," he shares, flanked by his manager who provides real-time updates on the flurry of engagements he has coming up. "I'll ask myself, 'Is this going to offend somebody?,' before I do it. A lot of the stuff I used to do years before would sometimes go too far. I know I have a platform now, so there's more of a need to make sure nothing is hurtful or too crazy. Even dealing with mean people, I can do it because I understand them. I used to sometimes say mean shit for no reason. I know that when people say things they're just thoughts that might be there today but I'm not going to care about tomorrow. What am I even gaining from acknowledging it?"


None


Well before the @NasMaraj account was suspended and he'd dropped out of the University of West Georgia, where he originally planned to study computer science, Nas commanded the global village that is the internet with an above-average fluency, even amongst his Gen Z peers. These days, whether it's randomly polling Twitter users to help him decide on which dog to adopt — he ended up getting two puppies named 7 and 9 — or casually cracking jokes about being the target of homophobia after coming out, somewhat strategically, on World Pride Day, Nas wields the power of social media in a way that is at once innocently charming and calculatedly shrewd.

None


"I've watched the music industry from the sidelines, so I learned what to do and what not to do and who I wanted to be friends with," Nas shares, his tall, lanky frame making bowling a rather endearing affair of mostly legs and elbows. Indeed, Nas has transitioned seamlessly into the celebrity sphere, making fast admirers out of stars ranging from Billy Ray Cyrus to Billie Eilish, Rihanna, Da Baby and more. "I would watch a lot of musicians try to come up by doing crazy stuff and using outrageous behavior to keep attention. I even thought about doing that, like maybe busting a car window or something to get attention, but I knew I could do it without making everything into a stunt."

None


"I've watched the music industry from the sidelines, so I learned what to do and what not to do."

None


Yet the proliferation of "Old Town Road" was, in many ways exactly that: a stunt of epic proportions. In the same way that Soulja Boy once seized upon the creative potential of intentionally naming Napster files after popular songs to deliver unsuspecting fans "Crank Dat" instead, Lil Nas appropriated the virality of memes and TikTok challenges to Trojan Horse "Old Town Road" to the top of the charts. The song was released independently on December 3, 2018, and over the course of several months, Nas obsessively hammered out a series of five to seven second videos embedded with snippets of the tune, releasing them on TikTok and Twitter. At the time, he'd dropped out of school and was living with his older sister. The arrangement was supposed to be temporary, but financial constraints and family tension with his parents saw him staying with her for months longer than anticipated, so naturally, there was little else to do but hope that the promise of music finally delivered.

None


None


As the song took off, Nas also leveraged the internet's openness to change by adjusting its original, more serious meaning as "Old Town Road" gained traction. The lyrics, which he'd formerly described as being representative of trying to rise above a difficult personal situation (with the "road" being an allegory for a journey toward self-improvement), suddenly became the stuff of light-hearted legend. "I changed the meaning so I could joke around and have it be meme'd out because I knew how I was going to promote it," he says. Earlier that year in July, he'd quietly released Nasarati, a decidedly hip-hop facing EP, which, while sonically falling in line with popular rap tropes, failed to make the impact he'd hoped, especially within the landscape of Atlanta where Lil Baby, Young Thug, Future and others had already all but cornered the market. "I've always liked different genres but I didn't have money; it was easier to start with hip-hop because you can rap without that many tools. The Nasarati EP was made a month after I made my first song. 'Old Town Road' only happened when I started to get more comfortable trying new things like singing," Nas admits.

None


And while the gamble certainly paid off — there's an irresistible quality to Nas' deliciously contrived country twang, especially when juxtaposed against the aggressive boom of 808s — the song's perfect melding of oddity and genuine musicality seemed to many like a one-off slam dunk. "A lot of people think that I'm a meme rapper and so they felt like after 'Old Town Road' I was done," Nas says. "I still get one hit wonder comments and I have two new songs on [the Billboard charts]," he continues between mouthfuls of shrimp and french fries. The songs in question, "Panini" (which accidentally interpolates Nirvana's "In Bloom"), and the Cardi B featured "Rodeo", are currently ranked 29 and 60 respectively on the Hot 100 chart; both also appear on his debut EP, 7.

None


Related | How Country Continues to Erase Lil Nas X

None


Released June 21, 7's hasty rollout seemed to be a concerted effort to maximize the cultural currency of "Old Town Road," which sparked dialogues on everything from race to the boundaries of defining music by genre. Having first landed on Billboard's country chart, "Old Town Road" was unceremoniously pulled for not having enough "country elements" before being reintroduced after Billy Ray Cyrus appeared on the remix. "I was honestly surprised about how much support I got," Nas says. "It's almost as if everything that happened was a blessing in disguise. Everything that looked like it would be the end for me only made the song more popular."

None


None


None


The song's success has also put Nas in an odd position, framing him as a genre-bending vanguard who has, along with the likes of Solange, Beyoncé and others who have helped further "The Yeehaw Agenda," as culture critic Bri Malandro officially dubbed it, helped to resurface country music's rich history of Black influence. "I'm happy that people think I'm doing important work, but I'm never trying to see myself in too much of high position," Nas says, modestly of the controversy. "I'm just making music. I'm not going to say I did it so other Black country artists could have voices, because that's not the truth. If that happened, then that's awesome. I see songs that blend country and hip-hop on the rise and that's amazing to be part of. I just like to believe 'Old Town Road' has generally opened doors in a lot of directions. I mean it opened the door for me to make 7."

None


The 7 EP received a range of reviews, with more than a few critics observing the offering felt disjointed, but to Nas, who is very much part of a new breed of multi-hyphenate makers, creativity needn't be a streamlined process. And, just like the chaotic nature of viral fame, music shouldn't have a certain formula for success. "On 7 nothing was intentional. I didn't think to myself, Ok I'm going to make an alt-rock song or I'm going to make a rap song and include jazz elements. I just thought, I feel like this would sound good here or that would sound good there, and then I just rolled with it. There was no direction, it's just whatever comes out sounding the best," he says of his creative process. "I'm lucky because coming into music the way I did gave me more freedom to have less direction. Even now, I'll have moments where someone will be like, 'This is the worst song on the EP,' and someone else will be like, 'This is the only song I like on the EP,' and they'll be talking about the same song. I've always understood that different people like different things, and I'm in a position where I can put out whatever I want out, so I feel like I can cater to it all. I know there's a demand for more songs like 'Old Town Road' because people keep telling me to make a whole country EP, but at the same time people are still listening to 'Panini' and 'Rodeo,' so it's like you actually can do everything."

None


"I'm happy that people think I'm doing important work, but I'm never trying to see myself in too much of high position. I'm just making music."

None


On his debut studio album, Nas hopes to prove that working beyond guardrails of genres and pre-ordained creative direction can indeed open a world of possibilities. "I do feel like once I give myself a, 'You need to do this or you need to go this way,' that's when it'll be easy for me to slip up trying to recreate the same environment in a song," he confesses. Above all, he hopes to show fans a more personal side, admitting that much of the lyrics in 7 were intentionally coded, leaving listeners to draw their own conclusions. "It's funny because everyone thought 'C7osure' was about leaving somebody, but it was about leaving away from a situation that wasn't doing me good," he says.

None


None


The transition from high school to college tends to be difficult for most people, and Nas was no exception. Although he graciously side-steps providing more detail on precisely what inspired "C7osure," he does open up about how contending with financial problems and adjusting to college life indirectly impacted those around him. "After senior year I pretty much wore whatever clothes I had bought for the next two-ish years," he shares. "I didn't really have a chance to develop a sense of style because I would wear literally anything that looked alright that I could afford, which was barely anything. On top of that, college was my first time getting an F. The summer I dropped out I was supposed to go to a summer program at my school because I'd just gotten too comfortable and wasn't doing well. I was top of my class in everything in high school, so that was a huge adjustment." In songs like "F9mily," a pop-punk inflected collaboration with Blink 182 drummer Travis Barker, he does make an admittedly veiled effort to touch on frayed family dynamics, which were only exacerbated by his choice to leave school after the first year. On first listen the song feels like a playfully ironic ballad to broken connections, but according to Nas, actually comes from a much more serious place, as does the use of the number "9" in the song's title.

None


"I really believe in signs and I started to see seven and nine a lot right around the time I was about to come out. I was originally going to do it at Pride because I saw a banner that said, 'LA Pride, June 7 -9,' and I was like, 'Wow, there goes the numbers again.' And then my sister ended up having her baby on the ninth, so nine became my number for family. Right now we're working on coming back together," Nas says of his current relationship with his family. "We're going to have the first family reunion on my mom's side this year; we didn't really have those when I was growing up. My grandma passed last year and that was really difficult. We had already stopped having family gatherings before that so I really want to try to get better about all of that stuff."


None


Between planning more family events, Nas will be continuing on the festival circuit and also spending time in the studio perfecting his debut album. Having a project drop on the heels of a record-breaking single and an EP that produced two more charting songs is admittedly quite a bit of pressure, but Nas is less concerned about proving himself to naysayers than enjoying the chaos of the journey. "Honestly, I feel like I put together a certain formula for each song as far as length or not having too much of one element going on for too long, but it's not a science where I'm like, I'm going to use this melody on this song because if I do, it'll be a hit; that's not how it works. That's why for my next project I'm just thinking about whatever I feel sounds good." So far, it's a method that hasn't failed him.


None


Photographer: Ethan Gulley
Photo Assistant: Adam Siler
Stylist: Mercedes Natalia
Stylist Assistant: Fernanda Linhares & Kaila Taylor
Groomer: Sienree
Producer: Blair Cannon




]]>
Tue, 06 Aug 2019 15:12:22 +0000http://www.qladfj.tw/lil-nas-x-unicorn-floatie-2639677075.htmlLil nas xGordon ramsayOld town roadHotMusicLgbtqHip-hopMontero lamont hillStory Stephanie Smith-Strickland / Photography Ethan Gulley / Styling Mercedes Natalia
pc蛋蛋预测软件码源
私彩快三漏洞 双色球投注单如何填 幸运飞艇大神贴吧 体育彩票app扫码兑奖 北京pk赛车合法么 骰盅玩法 彩票免费破解器 香港四肖八码怎么找不到呢 跟千里马计划怎么跟 宝宝人工账号计划